Critical Reflection of an Interview

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  • Topic: Psychiatry, Nursing, Psychiatric and mental health nursing
  • Pages : 3 (1155 words )
  • Download(s) : 706
  • Published : May 15, 2013
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This piece of reflective writing about my university interview will be based on the model of Gibbs reflective cycle (1988) this is the reflective cycle developed by Graham Gibbs (1988) in order to structure the events surrounding my interview and subsequent reflection. When the university offered me a chance to attend the selection day for the mental health nursing course I was filled with a sense of curiosity as to how being interviewed in a group format would differ to my previous experiences. Prior to the interview I considered the nursing knowledge I had acquired and wanting to develop to achieve the best academic qualifications, through research I found that The Times stated in 2009 that the University of Nottingham's "Academic Strengths Ranked as the 10th best university in the UK by the Shanghai Jiao Tong world rankings index Placed in the top one per cent of all universities worldwide" (The Times Good University Guide, 2009). I approached the interview knowing that they offered everything I required academically and also wanting to show what I could offer to the university. When I arrived at Nottingham University, it became apparent there was a vast amount of people attending the selection day and competition was obviously fierce and CL Hardy considers that “Interviews are performance events--high pressure situations that can initiate the dreaded anxiety attack” (CL Hardy, 2012) and I recall feeling slightly anxious. After the initial meet and greet seminar we were split into smaller groups within a classroom. Upon entering the classroom I began to feel apprehensive and self-aware of my actions and how this could affect my chances of being accepted, it is understood that “performance will be enhanced or impaired only in the presence of persons who can approve or disapprove our actions” (Nickolas B. Cottrell, 1972) The room contained three assessing staff and about ten group members, we all gave a brief introduction about ourselves and any personal...
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