Critical Reading Of Professional Literature

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 Teacher: Mr.Vaughn Subject: Biology Dates: 9/24/12-9/28/12 Time Period: 2nd,3rd, 5th  DAY
GPS
ESSENTIAL
QUESTIONS
LEARNING
ACTIVITY
DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION
MATERIALS /
RESOURCES
ASSESSMENT
MISC.
MONDAY
SB4a, SB4c–d, SCSh2b, SCSh3d, SCSh6d
EOCT: Ecology

How do environmental conditions and human
activities lead to changes in communities?

TW:Mini-lesson:
1) Define succession and differentiate between primary and secondary succession. 2) Explain the role of pioneer species in primary succession. 3) Explain that the length of time it takes for succession to lead to a climax community depends on the type of community and the influence of abiotic factors and human activities on its species. 4) Provide examples of human activities and natural events that can cause or affect each type of succession (e.g., an avalanche leading to primary succession or a forest fire caused by humans leading to secondary succession) 

SW:Discussion Prompt: How can human activities contribute to succession in a community? Is it possible for humans to interrupt succession? If so, how?
INSTRUCTION
INDIVIDUAL
SMALL GROUP
WHOLE GROUP

LEARNING STYLES
AUDITORY
VISUAL
KINESTHETIC / TACTILE
PRESENTATION
ORAL PROMPTS
WRITTEN
HANDS-ON
VISUAL AIDS
MANIPULATIVES
TECHNOLOGY
MODELING
 ACTIVITIES
OTHER     
Computer, LCD Projector, Textbooks, Paper and Pencil

FORMATIVE
DISCUSSION
QUESTION & ANSWER
QUIZ
WORK SAMPLE
TEACHER-MADE TEST
SUMMATIVE
TEST
PROJECT
PRESENTATION
PORTFOLIO
OTHER:
     
     

TUESDAY
SB4a, SB4d, SCSh3c, SCSh6d, SCSh9a
EOCT: Ecology

How does pollution affect ecosystems?
How do pesticides disrupt food chains?

TW:Review the homework by asking student volunteers to suggest ways one population’s growth can lead to another population’s disappearance during succession.
• Display a blank copy of a K-W-L Chart (ER, p. GPT-8) on pollution. Have students individually complete the chart except for the L column.
• (Teacher Note: The K-W-L Chart will be completed during the Warm-Up section of tomorrow’s lesson, so you may wish to collect it from students for safekeeping.)

SW:Organize the students in groups of 3–4, and ask each group to write down ways that pollution released into the environment might affect plants or animals in an ecosystem. Have students list as many possibilities as they can think of in five minutes ( INSTRUCTION

INDIVIDUAL
SMALL GROUP
WHOLE GROUP

LEARNING STYLES
AUDITORY
VISUAL
KINESTHETIC / TACTILE
PRESENTATION
ORAL PROMPTS
WRITTEN
HANDS-ON
VISUAL AIDS
MANIPULATIVES
TECHNOLOGY
MODELING
 ACTIVITIES
OTHER     
Computer, LCD Projector, Textbooks, Paper and Pencil

FORMATIVE
DISCUSSION
QUESTION & ANSWER
QUIZ
WORK SAMPLE
TEACHER-MADE TEST
SUMMATIVE
TEST
PROJECT
PRESENTATION
PORTFOLIO
OTHER:
     
     

WEDNESDAY
SB4a, SB4d, SCSh3d, SCSh4a, SCSh6d, SCSh9a,
SCSh9c
EOCT: Ecology

How do populations grow and what factors limit
population growth?

TW:Use Figure 4.3 in GL, p. 97, to explain how populations grow exponentially. • Ask students why populations cannot continue to grow endlessly. Explain carrying capacity, using “Inside Story” in GL, p. 98, to illustrate population growth patterns. • Define and provide examples of limiting factors on populations. Explain that factors that limit one population in a community can also affect other populations (e.g., populations in the same food chain). Teacher Note: See GL, pp. 68, 97, and 100–101, for examples of limiting factors.

SW:Have students study the graph in Figure 4.8 in GL, p. 102, and suggest reasons the lynx and hare populations rise and fall together. Explain that population sizes can be controlled by interactions among organisms in a community, including predation, competition, and...
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