Critical Analysis of Great Gatsby

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Critical Analysis of Great Gatsby

By | Jan. 2006
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The Great Gatsby is a romantic but dramatic story of Jay Gatsby who tries to redeem his love that he once had with the women of his dreams, Daisy. Gatsby is a tragic hero and a romantic. Gatsby has a tragic flaw that meets his fate with death. Jay Gatsby is a rich man and his wealth defined his importance. He is a romantic dreamer who wishes to fulfill him dream with Daisy. Gatsby's every move and every decision he makes is for a reason, which ends up being for love.

Everything Gatsby owns is there to obtain his dream with his love for Daisy. Gatsby has endless wealth that brings him closer to others. "Gatsby bought that house so that Daisy would be just across the bay," this shows that Gatsby is a romantic by buying his estate just to impress Daisy. Gatsby throws parties to hopefully have the women of his dreams show to one; this shows Gatsby as a true romantic. Nick goes to Gatsby's party to find others who don't even know who Gatsby is and finds rumors. Nick realizes that Gatsby's party are not pointless but are to one day impress Daisy and eventually win her heart. Gatsby soon calls off his parties, which were means to impress Daisy. He also fires his servants to prevent gossip and replaces them with shady ones.

Gatsby is a romantic dreamer who wishes to fulfill his dream by impressing and eventually winning the heart of Daisy. Daisy soon starts to get the feelings she used to obtain for Gatsby. Gatsby soon tells Tom "Your wife doesn't love you," "She's never loved you. She loves me. (137)" Gatsby shows he's a romantic by telling his love for Daisy and thinking it's the same in return. Gatsby gets his dream and leaves with Daisy, but later Daisy returns to Tom. Daisy later shows she is not worthy of Gatsby's love. Gatsby has a tragic flaw that meets his fate with death. "I called up Daisy half an hour after we found him, called her instinctively and without hesitation. But she and Tom had gone away early that afternoon, and taken baggage...
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