Crime and Punishment

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Crime and Punishment

By | November 2012
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Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky is an exemplary, and at the same time stereotypical testament to life in Soviet Russia. This story captures the weaknesses of everyone in the story and broadcasts them to the reader, in other words, Dostoevsky showed all the bad, all the secrets and all the torments of the characters. Dostoevsky’s focus on the weaknesses of his characters proves he wants to show his readers that no one in the world is perfect, and through this he proves that regardless of your situation, there’s someone else who might be going through a similar issue. Ultimately Dostoevsky’s point to the novel is to show readers to take responsibility for their actions and accept the punishments for their moral and/or legal crimes. Starting with Raskolnikov, he killed 2 women, one of which was pregnant, and he started feeling ill and depressed because he went into shock because he couldn’t completely believe he had killed those women. Throughout the entire novel Raskolnikov is confronted by every character, all of which trying to help him, especially Sonya. It becomes obvious toward the end of the novel that Sonya has built feelings for Raskolnikov and Raskolnikov himself realizes that at the end as well when Dostoevsky states, “In that moment Raskolnikov knew in his heart, once and for all, that Sonya will be with him for always, and would follow him to the ends of the earth, wherever destiny might send him” (445). Bearing this in mind, Raskolnikov goes into the Police station, turns himself in, after being made to go back in a second time by Sonya and Raskolnikov legally compensates for his crime. However it is clear that Raskolnikov has done more than enough to satisfy his moral punishment, which he does through charity to Marmeladov, Sonya, Dunya, Razumikhin and even street beggars. For instance, when Raskolnikov concludes, “Ha, there’s a five-copeck piece still left in my pocket; where did it come from? Here you are … take it, little mother!” (444)....
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