Criitique of a Quantitive Paper

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Critique of a Quantitative Paper
Arlene Johnson RN, BSN, CCRN
GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY

Abstract

In order to function as an educated consumer of research, it is required to have the ability to understand and analyze research articles. Nurses must apply critical thinking skills when evaluating research articles. The following paper is a critique of a quantitative research article titled “Changes in Childhood Risk Taking and Safety Behavior after a Peer Group Media Intervention” (Kennedy & Chen, 2009).

Critique of a Quantitative Paper
The title “Changes in Childhood Risk Taking and Safety Behavior after a Peer Group Media Intervention” (Kennedy & Chen, 2009), accurately reflected the content of the article and research itself. The abstract explained the article in extremely precise detail. The research study, variables, sample size, intervention, methods, and findings were all mentioned. The authors stated the importance of the problem area, risk taking is significant health- comprising behaviors among children that are often portrayed unrealistically in the media as consequence free (Kennedy & Chen, 2009). Problem Statement

The purpose of the study is to test a peer group aimed at decreasing physical risk taking behaviors by influencing children’s media behaviors. Risk taking is a significant health- compromising behavior among children that are often portrayed unrealistically in the media as consequence free. Physical risk taking can lead to injury, and injury is the leading cause of hospitalization and death during childhood. Injury is a phenomenon that is underrepresented in nursing research. This lack of research on injury is critical given that rates for counseling about injury prevention remain low (Kennedy & Chen 2009). Research Question

Does the four week research program designed to reduce risk taking behaviors and increase safety behaviors work? Does the children’s media increase risk taking behaviors and are...
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