“Creating Transformational Spaces: High School Book Clubs with Adolescent Females.”

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 Transformation is a catalyst toward creating a new self-identity. It is the process that when an individual faces an experience that is so powerful it creates change in one’s life. Polleck’s article “Creating Transformational Spaces: High School Book Clubs with Adolescent Females” highlights the importance of transformation acquired through collective reading. The young girls in this article, like most individuals, connect their personal lives to the characters within the text they read, in order to understand, symbolize and represent themselves better. Novels have enlarged a female’s “emotional capacity and maturity, where both cognitive and affective development is enhanced”(Polleck 52). Not only does reading enhance emotional aspects of ones life it also is able to create societal change. Polleck addresses the fact that “women who participated in book clubs made new friends and became more reflective about their lives, more tolerant of others, and more confident about working in collaborative settings, particularly with other women”(65).

The impact reading creates towards surrounding individuals is further discovered in Montgomery’s novel. Anne plays a significant role in societal change within Avonlea. Anne, a passionate reader, inspires her female classmates to read by creating a book club. Through the creation of this club, the Avonlea girls gain a greater sense of knowledge as they discuss and share their opinions collectively. Anne creates a book club in order to help cultivate her friends imaginations and by doing so they are able to “write stories for practice”(210) which assists the girls in achieving high scores for their class essay.  



Anne’s book club is an example that through the consequence of reading, the needs of

women within book clubs are surprisingly fulfilled. This common satisfaction in turn “contributes to the group’s solidarity” (Rehberg Sedo 67). Rehberg Sedo acknowledges that women relate themselves to the text, which...
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