Crash: Race and African American Employees

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There are many movies that show the public perceptions about psychology, which are strongly influenced by the media. The information presented in the media can be sympathetic and enlightening. They can extend the stigma often associated with mental and/ or behaviors, disorders, as well as a broad range of psychological issues. Paul Haggis showed racism, prejudice, discrimination, and attitudes of different ethnic groups in the movie Crash. Crash shows societies racial-discrimination through schemas, how stereotypes and the primary effect influence the characters, and their processes of social cognition.

Paul Haggis showed the hatred and racial-discrimination portrayed by individuals based on their ethnicity. Every ethnic group has certain stereotypes known about them; these stereotypes influence others views about them. In Crash, individuals who are white, African American, Latino, Iranian, Asian, and Mexican crash together. Each character was linked to all the others through an event. The setting is in Los Angles where many races collide together in a series of nonviolent and violent encounters. Crash begins by showing the lives of the main characters and the psychological issues the go through each day, because of the prejudice based on the stereotypes that prevent each individual from seeing the other person for who he or she is, thus showing the terrible expanding the self-fulfilling prophecies.

Many of the characters have been through some king of experience, which led to the way they are. Officer John Ryan plays the racist white cop, because when his father owned a company, he paid the African Americans equal wages and worked with them side by side. Then one day the city council made an affirmative action, which was to give minorities contracts, so after that his father lost everything including his wife, job, and home. Ryan became racist after that, because he was affected personally by that event. He believes that his father’s life was ruined by those African American employees. Now his father has prostate cancer, but is diagnosed wrong with a Urinary tract infection; the African American HMO clerk would not give his father permission to see another doctor. In return Ryan takes out his frustration on an African American couple during a traffic stop by groping on the women, while her husband is standing unable to do anything.

Continuing on, when District Attorney Rick Cabot and Jean Cabot were walking down the sidewalk, Jean notices two African American men (Anthony and Peter) walking toward her, so she holds Rick’s arm for protection. Jean Cabot acted that way because she believes in the stereotypes that are said about African Americans, such as they are violent. She reacted to the fear by holding Rick’s arm. Jeans self-fulfilling prophecy is confirmed when Anthony and Peter carjack them at gunpoint. Then Jean was unwilling to change the schema by apply it with the Mexican locksmith. When she seen the locksmith working in her home, she became prejudice by saying he was going to sell the house keys to his gang members. She applied the stereotype that Mexicans with shaved heads, pants beneath the waist, and with tattoos are gang members. Her schema did not fit because the locksmith gave her all the house keys, and her expectations were not confirmed (Crash 2004).

Furthermore, when Anthony the African American was talking about how white people are racist, and think every African American is violent, he fulfilled Jean Cabot’s expectations by carjacking them. And when he was said that the African American waitress did treat them well because of the stereotype that African Americans do not tip. He fulfilled her expectations too by not paying the tip. Second example of racism in the movie is when Ria the Latino detective got into a car accident at the beginning of the movie. She started say racial comments about the Asian women. Including Asians do not know how to drive, which is a stereotype. She at the end...
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