Court Observation

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If Frederick were to ask me for my advice concerning this scenario, I would advise him not to file suit. This was admittedly a difficult decision for me. The basis for this decision is 1Corinthians 6:7, which states, “Therefore, to have legal disputes against one another is already a moral failure for you. Why not rather put up with injustice? Why not rather be cheated (HCSB)?” H. Wayne House says it best when he states, “This is a difficult saying, but there are many difficult sayings in the Bible, and their difficulty does not render them unsaid” (House, 1999). I agree with House and believe that the Bible may not always be easy to follow, but it is always right. As Christians, every situation needs to be examined thoroughly by use of Scripture to ensure that we are acting in a way that glorifies God.

There is also a possibility that Frederick would be unable to prove that the idea was his to begin with. He would have to be able to prove that he was the one who came up with the idea. This could prove to be a difficult task. If he were unable to prove beyond reasonable doubt that this was his idea, he may end up in worse shape after the legal fees and time missed for court. He may be better off not pursuing legal action.

As stated above, this was a difficult decision. How far do we take the idea that we are not to pursue legal action or compensation? What about cases such as being in a car accident? Should we not pursue compensation for damages? While I may not be able to answer this question myself, one thing I can say with certainty is that the Bible is very clear about forgiveness. Christ forgave us, even though we are unworthy. If we are to be more Christ-like, we would do well to forgive others, just as He has forgiven us.

References
H. Wayne House, Christian ministries and the law: Revised edition (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Kregel, 1999), 176.
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