Cotton Candy

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  • Topic: Confectionery, William Morrison, Candy
  • Pages : 3 (1040 words )
  • Download(s) : 168
  • Published : April 11, 2013
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Cotton candy
History
Cotton candy was first recorded in the 16th century.[4] At that time, spun sugar was an expensive, labor-intensive endeavor and was not generally available to the average person.[4] Machine-spun cotton candy was invented in 1897 by the dentist William Morrison and confectioner John C. Wharton and first introduced to a wide audience at the 1904 World's Fair as "Fairy Floss"[5] with great success, selling 68,655 boxes at the then-high price of 25¢, half the cost of admission to the fair (equivalent to $6 today). Joseph Lascaux, a dentist from New Orleans, Louisiana, invented a similar cotton candy machine in 1921. In fact, Lascaux patent named the sweet confection “cotton candy” and the "fairy floss" name faded away, although it retains this name in Australia.[6][7] In the 1970s an automatic cotton candy machine was created which made the product and packaged it. This made it easier to produce and available to sell at carnivals, fairs, and stores in the 1970s and on. Evolution

Cotton Candy first became a hit in Italy around the 15th century. People used to make the candy in a pan by melting the sugar. Sometimes they used a fork to create sugar-strings over an over-turned bowl. Other times they used another tool for making the strings. The sugar usually dries instantly and can be reshaped into however the maker wanted it to look. Over time, and well into the 19th century, other designs of Cotton Candy Machines surfaced, making it possible to create multiple candy designs such as Easter-Egg Coatings or pure Easter-Egg Sugar candies. During these times, other methods and techniques were implemented and it allowed for the candies to have differing color designs, giving it a tasty and pleasant attraction to it. However, the whole process of making the Cotton Candy was usually too time-consuming and costly. It was therefore relegated to occasional parties, for desserts or for some other special occasion. It was very rare for the commoner to taste...
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