Cotards Syndrome

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Cotard syndrome was named after Jules Cotard. A French neurologist he called the condition le délire de négation (“negation delirium”). There are multiple levels from mild to severe. Cotard had formed a new type of depression, where one denies their own existence.

When the area of the brain that recognizes faces is disconnected, with the area that associates emotions with those faces. This can also be caused from major depression with psychotic features, schizophrenia, or organic mental conditions. In people 25 and under it has been considered to be associated with bipolar disorder.

In an analysis of 100 cases the most prominent symptoms in Cotard Syndrome are: depressive mood (89%), nihilistic delusion concerning one’s own existence (69%), anxiety (65%), delusion of guilt (63%), delusion of immortality (55%), hypochondriac delusion (58%). The likelihood of contracting Cotard Syndrome increases with age. Women appear to be more vulnerable. Several organic conditions were also associated: dementia, typhoid fever, brain tumors, brain injury, and others.

Symptoms may include analgesia and mutism. Having delusions of massive increase of body measures, which is described as Maniac Cotard Syndrome. If reached the state of intense fantasy, deception, and chronic depression is when it’s considered severe. Suicidal thoughts, belief that they no longer have a body, and already dead. Sometimes they believe that their body is rotting, occasionally believe that they’re immortal.

There are several medications and treatments for this syndrome. One treatment is to see a mental health specialist. Pharmacological monotheraphy such as amitriptyline, aripiprazole, duloxtine, fluoxetine, olanzapine, sulpiride, and lithium has been proven effective. The most effective rearmament proven thus far is electroconvulsive therapy.
Complete recovery may occur spontaneously and as suddenly as it...
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