Cosmological Argument and Creation Myth

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Judeo-Christian Creation Myth

In the Judeo-Christian creation myth, God created light and darkness, the sky, sun, moon and stars, the land and the sea, sky dwellers, sea dwellers, and land dwellers, and on the seventh and final day, God rested from work and nothing was created. The reason that God rested was because even he believes that nobody should be constantly working and if you have earned it, a rest is in order. This is where the idea of a Sabbath day came into the Jewish beliefs, which is basically every Sunday no Jew is allowed to make work, do work, or even basically think of it. They just relax, and aren’t even allowed to travel far, only to the local Synagogue and back. But we all follow Gods example, because we are his design, and he designed us to be in his image, and because he is Omnibenevolent, he allows us to have a day of rest; a day which is free of worry and stress.

Cosmological ‘First Cause’ Argument

This was propounded by St Thomas Aquinas, and the ideas to this argument are found in his book Summa Theologica. He takes the universe as his starting point, because he knows for definite, that exists. However, he also says the universe is the end of his chain. Aquinas describes this chain as a ‘domino effect’ because once a causer causes something to happen; this then causes something else to happen, and so on. The causer here is God, and he is the Uncaused Cause, because God has always existed. Aquinas argued that the universe was created by a series of causes and effects, hence why he uses it as his end point in his theory. If you traced all of these causes back to the creation of the Universe, you would result in God; the First Motion (Unmoved Mover), First Cause (Uncaused Cause) and the First Being (Non-contingent)
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