Corruption in Bangladesh

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Table of contents

1. Introduction………………………………2
2. Importance of this study………………..4
3. Literature review………………………...5
4. Methodology…………………………….7
5. Findings…………………………………..8 6. Elimination………………………………..15 7. Impact……………………………………18 8. Conclusion………………………………20
9. Reference………………………………..23

Introduction
Corruption is a topic of interest and concern in academic circles, in the media, among people of different professions, within the civil service, among members of parliament, politicians, government officials, members of the business and financial communities, students, foreign investors, and so on. In other words, the term corruption is not new to Bangladesh. We all know that Bangladesh is one of the most corrupted country in the world. Bangladesh is the five times champions in corruption in the world. It can be said that corruption is in our vains. A general impression conveyed by the media and by popular discussion is that among ordinary people in Bangladesh, corruption is viewed quite clearly as 'a way of life'. A recent survey by the Bangladesh Unnayan Parishad shows that 95 percent of respondents believed that the police were the most corrupt department in the land, followed very closely by the customs. A solid 62 percent of respondents believed that the primary responsibility for corruption in Bangladesh lay in the hands of government officials. Does this mean that the people of Bangladesh are unmoved by the all-pervasive level of corruption in their polity? Or have they become so immune to its horrors, so cynical about what they perceive to be the unhappy reality of their lives, that they have ceased to care? Whatever the reasons, people appear extremely unwilling to believe that anything can be done about corruption. Perhaps this is one reason for a marked absence of objective, analytical literature on corruption as a social exchange or process. There are, of course, other reasons. But generally speaking, there is a tendency to focus on the size of the problem, on the normal aspects of corruption, on the (undoubtedly) negative impact of corruption and indeed, to carry on the idea that corruption is its own culprit. Corruption, in our view, lies at the root of the overall degeneration of politics and of a section of our politicians that we see today. Thus, corruption is seen both as the root and as the effect of a situation, with the result that its most important features are often masked and its behavioural patterns are difficult to separate.

Importance of this study
As a responsible citizen of Bangladesh, it is our duty to know about the negative aspects of our country. In any means, corruption is destroying our country and jeopardizing the future plans of improvement. Corruption has weaken the economic backbone of our country. Indeed, as far as Bangladesh is concerned, little is known about the manner in which corruption occurs, the process by which, most likely, it grows and flourishes, the conditions which are conducive to its existence and the structures which support its survival. Little is known about corruption as a process, as practice and as structural outcome. It can be said, therefore, that there is inconsequential independent judgment of corruption as a social phenomenon in this country. Whatever independent or neutral discussion has been generated, tends to focus mainly on the political or economic aspects of corruption. Certainly, very few academic works have been dedicated towards obtaining empirically sound, theoretical analyses of the subject from a sociological perspective with special reference to Bangladesh. This Study will, it is hoped, remedy the lack in several ways. A major aim of this Study has been to seek out works with a sociological perspective of corruption in Bangladesh. As the Study will bear out, the search has been disappointing in the sense that only a few works of specific relevance have been found....
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