Corporate Social Responsibility at Dhl

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CORPORATE
SOCIAL
RESPONSIBILITY
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For a transport and logistics company of your choice, critically discuss the company’s approach to Corporate Social Responsibility| C.S.R – D.H.L| |

THE UNIVERSITY OF HUDDERSFIELD – STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT – DR ANDREW JENKINS

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Table of Contents........................................................................................................2 Executive Summary.....................................................................................................3 Introduction..................................................................................................................4 Chapter 1 - What is CSR & why is it important?..........................................................5 1.1 CSR definitions.................................................................................5 1.2 Founding father of CSR ...................................................................5 1.3 CSR within an organisation..............................................................6

Chapter 2 - Critiques of CSR.......................................................................................7 2.1 CSR critics & their criticisms............................................................7 Chapter 3 – DHL Case study.......................................................................................8 3.1 CSR according to DHL.....................................................................8 3.2 Critical discussion of DHL’s approach to CSR.................................8 Conclusion.................................................................................................................12 References................................................................................................................13

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Executive Summary

Corporate social responsibility may be defined simply as a way in which corporations act more responsibly having both social and financial objectives. Despite my attempts to offer a simple definition for CSR, key authors in this field are yet to give one universal definition for the term. This is due to their being two differing schools of thought, which disagree as to the purpose of CSR, be it that businesses are only obligated to maximise profits within the boundaries of the law (Friedman, 1970 & Levitt 1958) Or that business have a much broader range of obligations (Carrolls, 1979 & Andrews 1973). Despite these conflicting arguments for CSR, Carroll’s (1979) definition has been used as he is seen to bridge the gap between these two schools of thought (Schwartz & Carroll, 2003).

CSR practices in today’s business world, according to Crowe & Balch (2000) can be seen in the marketplace, Community and the environment, showing that organisations do not focus primarily on economic and financial gain. However, Perrini et al (2006) states, CSR adoption may be seen by some businesses to have positive financial and economic outcomes, though there seems to be no firm correlation (although research is being conducted regarding this by Jay Barney).

CSR has had its fair share of criticisms, since the early days, most notably by Milton Friedman (Mares, 2008) who argues that CSR is a waste of corporate resources. Friedman’s critique of CSR is still used today as it was in 1970’s, especially as organizations do not enforce their CSR policies, as much as they do in their pursuit for more profits. Examples of businesses disregarding their CSR policies can be seen by a DHL example. DHL’s ddisrespect for employees’ right to freedom of association through Intimidation and other actions, as well as health and safety violations and accusations of racial discrimination all go to show a disregard for their corporate responsibility policies underpinned by its ‘respect & results’...
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