Corporate Environmental Obligation: an Examination of the Performance of Coca Cola

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Currently, due to the boosting economy and enhancing consumption of energy and other various resources, Australia becomes extremely flourishing. However, as a consequence of this, an increasing number of wastes are producing by local residents.

Before looking at the cause of waste overproducing, it is important to take a view of the definition of the waste. More specifically, according to Healey (2010), waste is generally defined as the materials that individuals have no desire to use and is planning to dispose of. Moreover, in an article by Hyder Consulting (2008), waste consists of three sectors: municipal waste; commercial and industrial waste; and construction and demolition waste.

This essay will discuss the causes of the growth in waste production, and suggest several treatments which could solve the waste production issues to some extent.

One of the most significant reasons, which contribute to the situation of waste overproducing, is the throw-away society. Specifically, there is considerable rubbish produced by goods that citizens never use. Nowadays, over$10.5 billion on products and services are discarded by Australians, which are never or hardly ever used every year (the Australia Institute’s report, “Wasteful Consumption in Australia”, 2005).

Based on the throw-away society, increase in development of disposal commodities has been bringing extreme convenience to modern citizens. Furthermore, the waste removal system enables residents hardly find their waste. As well as ‘out of sight is out of mind’, packaging and disposability can also make consumers to assure that these goods are not disadvantageous to the environment. As a result of this, consumers are predicted to buy more disposable products as a cycle (O’Connor, 2007).

It is also need to be mentioned that the consumer culture is so advanced that it has created a relationship with waste which cannot be easily severed, said Gay Hawkins, who is an associate professor of cultural...
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