Corporate Communication

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Corporate Communication Essay
Assessment One

Corporate Communication is the tool used to allow organisations to liaise with the public(s) and can be defined as... “…the set of activities involved in managing and orchestrating all internal and external communications aimed at creating favorable starting points with stakeholders on which the company depends”. In today’s world, corporate communication is vital to an organisations success and many academics argue the importance in coordinating this process. Professor Paul Argenti is one of many academics to have written a book on this topic. This essay will analyse Argenti’s views on the importance of co-ordination in corporate communication with detailed reference to corporate communication management in both the Liberal Democrats (Lib Dems) and McDonalds.

The structure that an organisation chooses for its corporate communication is largely dependent on their size and geographical dispersion. Larger organisations may find it harder to have a centralised system of communication when they have offices around the globe and therefore may find it beneficial to have a decentralised system, which allows for more flexibility. In Argenti’s book, Corporate Communication, there is discussion on the advantages of having both a co-ordinated and un-coordinated system. He does not believe that he, or anyone has the ability to say that either one of the systems is best as it depends completely on the organisation2. This idea would seem logical as Argenti uses case studies to back up this idea that neither system is the ‘better’ one. He states the importance of organisations realising the need for corporate reputation, which allows for competitiveness and success in the market. In recent years it has become increasingly important for organisations to create a coherent and credible image to the public as trust between consumers and companies is extremely low and actually ranks ‘second lowest rated of all institutions in the United States2’. With the revolution of social media, the way corporate communication works has changed forever, as now both the organisation itself and the stakeholders have control over the message the public relations campaigns are communicating. Within an organisation it is important to set up links between individuals and groups to ensure that “key strategic and operational information is shared effectively and appropriately”. This is where coordination of corporate communication is required. Lauren Vicker believes that it is essential in moving businesses forward as the external and internal environments are forever changing and companies have to break down the barriers of privacy in order to allow teamwork and the completion of tasks4. One organisation that puts a lot of money into their corporate communications is McDonalds fast food. It is no secret that fast food is not great for an individuals health which is why McDonalds see it as vital that they have a coordinated communication structure that allows coherent and clear communication with its public(s). The public have already seen McDonalds add salads and ‘healthier’ alternatives to the menu in recent times due to an increase in pressure from the external environment. An example of the importance in corporate communication to allow communication between both the organisation and public(s) happened in 2004 with the release of the film “Super Sized Me”. This ultimately led to the removal of McDonalds ‘super size’ meal option and instead creating an ‘adult happy meal’. Here is an example of how having centralised corporate communication has been beneficial to an organisation as all the McDonalds outlets adopted this and gave the perception of a global image that was concerned with the welfare and health of their customers. The company itself has a whole section of its website dedicated to informing the public of what their social responsibility thesis is and how they are achieving this. There have been...
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