Corporal Punishment

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 351
  • Published : March 7, 2006
Open Document
Text Preview
Corporal punishment is a very controversial topic that is being discussed amongst educators across the nation. Corporal punishment refers to any physical form of punishment, but in this case it refers to in schools. Currently there are many different terms used to label corporal punishment, for example, it has been called spanking, paddling, caning, lashing, popping, smacking, whipping or beating. Each term carries its own different meaning, but they all represents some form of corporal punishment.

Corporal punishment involves the deliberate infliction of pain upon a child, by an adult, as a result of the child's misbehavior or perceived misbehavior. It has been proven scientifically that the effects of it can be detrimental to the emotional and educational needs of children.

The most ironic thing I found pertaining to corporal punishment was that most people, (myself included) do not know that it is still common practice in some public schools in the United States. Many states have outlawed it because it was thought to be cruel and outdated. Some of the punishments were very cruel ranging from having students hold a dictionary over their head for an excess amount of time, paddling in front of school assemblies, to football coaches striking players with wooden paddles for not getting good enough grades. All of these practices seem unnecessary, cruel, and demeaning; but all of them were within the means of the law. Almost half of the states in the U.S. have refused to pass legislation banning corporal punishment in public schools. And in most of these states it is still very common practice.

Studies show that there is a regional pattern in the states that have not prohibited corporal punishment. It showed that all the states in the Deep South (Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisana) still had corporal punishment as law in public schools and that it is enforced in all these states. The pattern also covers Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma,...
tracking img