Corn Paper

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  • Topic: High-fructose corn syrup, Corn syrup, Obesity
  • Pages : 7 (2277 words )
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  • Published : May 29, 2013
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Fear of a Corn Planet
Final draft
Robert Ridley
Comp 2

Fear of a Corn Planet

For some time now corn has been an energy source and an enemy to all of America. Unbeknownst to us it has been secretly added to everything a normal American ingests on a daily bases. Products such as Soda pop, Energy bars, Red bull energy drinks, and most processed foods. Though corn does have its practical applications in fuel production as well as industrial uses, just about every food source sold in the normal grocery store has been tainted with some sort of corn product from bread to coffee. Nothing is safe from the monster that once held godly properties for the Aztecs, many other Native Americans and had won the acquiescence of the founding fathers during the settling of the nation. Corn, the menace that continues to make the United States an obese joke to the rest of the world, has truly taken an amazing journey through our culture. In all of its various forms, corn has been consistently added, in semi-secrecy, to the majority of products sold to the everyday consumer.

Years ago farmers were encouraged to grow more and were given government grants to do so. “Most of this comes from the Bush administration wanting to have ethanol to replace twelve percent of oil consumption by 2014” (Collapse movie). This would take all of the arable land and therefore this did not work for the simple fact that net energy would not allow it to be a viable fuel source. So now if one where to go to Iowa or Nebraska all they would see for miles and miles are would fields of corn. In 1979 a comity was formed to see just how efficient ethanol really was David Pimentel, professor emeritus of entomology at Cornell University concluded from this study that it would take more energy to produce ethanol than one could get out of it.”Department of Energy invited Pimentel to chair an advisory committee to look at ethanol as a gasoline alternative. The committee's conclusion: ethanol

requires more energy to produce than it delivers.“ (Philpott, 2006. para 2). It is very inefficient basically because first of all one uses oil powered vehicles to grow it (to seed, to spray chemicals and to harvest). The wheels where already set in motion by the time of this study, there were literally tons of corn to get rid of, which leads to one of the biggest cover ups in United States history, completely shocking actually.

One might be completely astounded to find out exactly what corn goes into. First of all it feeds live stock on any cattle farm, pig farm, or chicken coop in the United States today. Chickens get it directly and so do the pigs. “The cattle are fed fifty percent corn and soy bean mixture. Livestock, particularly when raised industrially (when they consume corn and soy instead of grass)“ (Hanauer, 2008, para 4) The average consumer has no idea that the meat that they buy at their local supermarket contains tons of sugars and corn. It is amazing how blind we have been to not see this sooner.

Corn Products International takes a kernel of corn and unleashes a variety of ingredients that act as building blocks for literally thousands of consumer and industrial products. Our ingredients can be broken down into four major categories: starches, sweeteners, co-products, and others. (Gordon, 2010. para 1)

First of all, corn starches come in many forms in the food industry; everything that is processed has corn starches somewhere in them, it is used as a thickening agent in foods like pie fillings, salad dressings, canned foods, most frozen foods, TV dinners and processed chicken patties. It has to end some where if half of the dieting Americans knew that these where added to their food unknowingly they would be outraged.

Starch does have practical uses in industry which may be where it should stay.
Starches are used to produce adhesives for shipping,and in the card board making...
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