Core Sample and Arctic Environment

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  • Topic: Core sample, Ice core, Earth
  • Pages : 5 (1355 words )
  • Download(s) : 351
  • Published : February 23, 2013
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Question 1

A)
i)
• A traditional Ivory ring and pin game
• A polar bear approaching Willem Barent’s men,
• Magnetic dip circle
• Ice core sampling
• The area of sea ice minimum from 1979-2008.

ii)

[pic]

iii)

Ice Core sampling: Ice core samples can be analysed and result can help scientist build a picture of climatic effects upon our environment

Engraving – A Polar bear approaching Willem Barent’s men: The arctic has had a long history with exploration and exploitation, from early European explorers in the 16th century to this day tensions regarding sovereignty of the arctic regional still exists.

The area of sea ice minimum from 1979-2008: modern day satellite imaging can show the dynamic nature of the arctic environment of periods time and the effects upon the arctic caused by climate change.

Magnetic Dip Circle: A scientific instrument from the 19th century used for measuring the earth’s magnetic field, used on the a1875-1876 British Artic Expedition.

A traditional Ivory ring and pin game: Traditional knowledge that has been passed through generations of indigenous Arctic people and are a vital resource to helping understand the Arctic environment to both inhabitants of the arctic regions and those who are studying it.

iv)

The theme for this exhibition is the search for knowledge in the arctic trough time, the starting point will be knowledge passed through generations of indigenous people of the arctic and ending at modern day techniques of collecting knowledge and using knowledge in order to discover and inform what the arctic can tell us about the earths climate, today, in the past and in the future.

Knowledge of the arctic environment comes from a varied degree of sources from human knowledge passed down through generations to scientific data collect by the latest scientific techniques. The oldest human knowledge can be traced to the indigenous people of the arctic region, much like any community knowledge is passed from the older generation to the younger generations as the grow. Indigenous Inuit tribes of the arctic have been teaching and passing down knowledge for generations, and an example of this can been seen in the bears and spear toy, younger generations about hunting in their environment. The knowledge of the indigenous people and of the people who live in the arctic region is valuable to scientific research and forming an overall understanding of the arctic environment, this knowledge is called traditional ecological knowledge or TEK.

Humans have had a long relationship with the arctic but the European relationship has, in relative terms, come about recently. Since the 16th Century explorers have been venturing into the artic for various pursuits, from laying claim to supposed unclaimed territory to mapping a Northwest Passage trade route and lures of discovering vast resources. Willem Barents was an early Dutch explorer and this engraving depicts a polar a bear encounter with Willem Barent’s men, where the men attempted to capture a polar bear alive but once on board the ship it raged and could not be contained.

European Arctic explorers also ventured into the arctic to locate the North Pole, expeditions solely for the purpose of locating the North Pole began as in the early 19th Century, these explorers took with them an array of scientific equipment and topographers in hope to record proof of reaching the north pole, one such instrument is the Magnetic Dip Circle used to measure the earths magnetic field in both latitude and longitude and could be used on a moving ship.

Scientific data collected form the arctic on expeditions like the one mentioned above is invaluable to those wanting to undiscovered what the arctic can tell us about its environment, and scientist have been sending expeditions to the arctic ever...
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