Conviction Offense and Prison Violence

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Conviction offense and prison violence

The study of the above statement by John Sorensen and mark D. Cunningham reveals that the disciplinary data done in 2003, involving 51,527 inmates who were serving sentences in the department of corrections of Florida and of the 51,527 involved to generate that data, 9,586 were homicide convicts charged on different degrees of homicide. The homicide convicts were amongst those researched on in respect to their involvement in prison violence and misconducts. Previous misconducts related to discipline and other forms of violence reported by the numbers of inmates present at the time of the evaluation which was 14,088 and a class of inmates who are kept under strict and direct supervision, of which they were 4,113 in total, were also considered. The preference and prevalence of violence in prisons reduced as the seriousness of the crime under which the inmate was sentenced increases. The study revealed that close custody inmates were not involved in or have had anything to do with the violence that erupts in the facilities in which they are located. Moreover, some negative regression models used to evaluate this observation shows that “serious” convicted offenders are less involved in prison violence than their colleagues who have been convicted of way less charges. The “three strike laws” provides the law courts with the power to impose harsher judgments and more severe punishments if a person is convicted more than three times with the degrees of the charges increasing. The laws however, limit the punishment to life imprisonment.

In another study related to this, it was found that correctional facilities experienced more cases of institutional misbehaviors than those facilities that are meant for confinement with no correctional intentions. Actual figures from the study shows that inmates in confinement facilities are less likely to be involved in any form of institutional misconducts than their counterparts in...
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