Conversation Analysis & Discourse Analysis

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Conversation Analysis & Discourse Analysis
tive Compara A a odu ritical Intr nd C ction

Robin Wooffitt

Conversation Analysis and Discourse Analysis

Conversation Analysis and Discourse Analysis
A Comparative and Critical Introduction

Robin Wooffitt

SAGE Publications
London ● Thousand Oaks ● New Delhi

© Robin Wooffitt 2005 First published 2005 Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of research or private study, or criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988, this publication may be reproduced, stored or transmitted in any form, or by any means, only with the prior permission in writing of the publishers, or in the case of reprographic reproduction, in accordance with the terms of licences issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency. Inquiries concerning reproduction outside those terms should be sent to the publishers. SAGE Publications Ltd 1 Oliver’s Yard 55 City Road London EC1Y 1SP SAGE Publications Inc. 2455 Teller Road Thousand Oaks, California 91320 SAGE Publications India Pvt Ltd B-42, Panchsheel Enclave Post Box 4109 New Delhi 110 017 British Library Cataloguing in Publication data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library ISBN 0 7619 7425 3 ISBN 0 7619 7426 1 (pbk)

Library of Congress Control Number 2004099541

Typeset by C&M Digitals (P) Ltd., Chennai, India Printed on paper from sustainable resources Printed in Great Britain by TJ International, Padstow, Cornwall

For Wendy

Contents

Acknowledgements

ix 1 5 25 46 71

Introduction

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Origins and Orientations Two Key Studies Method and Critique Similarities and Differences Persuasion and Authority: CA and the Rhetorical Turn in Discourse Studies Discursive Psychology Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Methodological Disputes: How Should We Analyse Talk? Conversation Analysis and Power

92 113 137

158 186 211 213 229

Appendix: Transcription Symbols References Index

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank my commissioning editor at Sage, Michael Carmichael. Throughout the period of writing this book, he has been extremely helpful and supportive; we had numerous meetings at which we discussed the (occasionally slow) progress of the manuscript, and he always exuded a quiet confidence in the project, which invariably fired my enthusiasm. He’s an excellent editor, and it has been a pleasure working with him. (He is also largely responsible for this book, probably much more so than most editors, for it was he who adroitly sidestepped my initial proposal to write a book on an entirely different topic, and gently suggested that I might like to consider writing something about the relationship between CA and DA. So it's his fault, really.) There is a community of scholars whose work has had an important influence on my own, and their research figures prominently in the pages which follow; and whose company at various conferences around the world has been great fun. You know who you are. To all of you, for providing such a supportive intellectual and (extended) social environment, I thank you. Derek Edwards and Jonathan Potter deserve a special mention. They read an earlier version of the manuscript and made numerous suggestions, all of which have made this a better piece of work. Finally, my debt to Wendy Tunnicliffe is enormous. For too long, I’ve been a peripheral presence at weekends and in the evenings, and she has put up with that without complaint. The dedication of this book to her in no way settles the debt, but it’s a start.

Introduction

This book has three objectives. First, it sets out to introduce conversation analysis (CA) and discourse analysis (DA) as methodological approaches to the study of talk, both of which have far-reaching implications for our understanding of social interaction and the role of discourse and communication in everyday life. Conversation analysis is one of the key...
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