Controversy of Medication

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Controversy of Medication
Lynnette Sharrer
AED/222
June 12, 2011
Professor Miller Sellner

A highly controversial issue that impacts society is the overmedication for children diagnosed with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) and EDB (Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities). A major concern of overmedicating for ADHD is that there may be a significant over-identification of students with this disorder. The rapid growth of the OHI category over the past decade (a growth of almost 700%) has further fueled these fears (Rosenberg, 2007). Although so many students are diagnosed with ADHD, students with EBD may be under-indentified, but some ethnic groups may be over-represented.

Medication for ADHD and EBD should e the last resort to “cure” the symptoms of these disorders. Explore all possible options before medication is ultimately used and to understand or try to find the root cause of the behavioral difficulties to work toward a solution. Putting children on medication is an easy step and avoids the deeper problems. Medication is managing symptoms and a “quick fix” to a problem, not “curing” an illness. Medications have many side-effects and may be damaging to the body.

EBD and ADHD are real and do exist in some children. Some children do have a chemical imbalance interfering with the ability to concentrate. These disorders may not have been recognized years ago, but they did exist. ADHD has no known cause but contributing factors include brain injury, brain, abnormalities, and hereditary. EBD has interrelated, interacting factors linked to no single cause including familial/home, biophysical, and psychodynamic factors.

Children with ADHD and EBD should stay in the general classrooms and obey the same rules as the other students. These children should have educational plans, behavioral treatment sessions, self-regulation instruction, and effective interventions. Children need positive reinforcement, time-outs, and discipline....
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