Contaminated Land Case Study - Flat Bush

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Asbestos, Manukau City, Auckland
  • Pages : 8 (2473 words )
  • Download(s) : 154
  • Published : November 13, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
| |

CASE STUDY OF CONTAMINATED SOIL

AN ASBESTOS CASE STUDY - FLAT BUSH, MANUKAU CITY, SOUTH AUCKLAND, NEWZEALAND.

July 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1BACKGROUND2
1.1Introduction2
1.2Flat Bush Asbestos Site Location2
1.3Site History3
2EVALUATION OF ASBESTOS EXTENT AND ITS IMPACTS5
2.1General5
2.2Health Issues6
2.3Remediation Options and Regulations6
3FACTS ABOUT ASBESTOS8
3.1Nature of Asbestos8
3.2Asbestos in Environment8
3.3Exposure to Lead9
3.4Harmful Health Effects from Asbestos Exposure9
4REVIEW OF ADOPTED REMEDIATION METHOD11
4.1Overview of Asbestos Remediation11
4.2Final View on Adopted Remediation at Flat Bush Site11 REFERENCES12

1 BACKGROUND

2.1 Introduction
In November 1997, housing developers began excavating a subdivision in Flat Bush, about 3km north-east of Manukau City. These works stopped abruptly when large quantities of fibre board and other cement-based building products were unearthed. All of these products were found to contain asbestos, and similar finds were made at five occupied properties nearby. 2.2 Flat Bush Asbestos Site Location

Flat Bush is situated in the Otara Ward 4 of Manukau City, approximately 30 kilometres south of Auckland’s Central Business District, and approximately 3 kilometres north-east of Manukau City Centre. Flat Bush, is a medium to low cost dormitory area including rental, state housing and private properties.

2.3 Site History
Asbestos products have been imported into New Zealand since the early 20th century. But the problem at Flat Bush was traced back to first asbestos plant, which from 1938 to the 1970s, manufactured certain asbestos products (cement building materials such as fibre board) on a limited scale, and distributed asbestos waste to farms in the Flat Bush area. Private contractors began delivering asbestos off-cuts from James Hardie’s Penrose factory to many farms throughout South Auckland. Many farmers used it as a multi-purpose landfill for gullies, the making of dams and for improving the drainage of boggy land, in addition to the making of driveways. Asbestos piping was also crushed for use on farm roads, while some drivers were delivering up to fifteen bags of pure blue asbestos (the most toxic) to farmers every month. In the late 1970’s, James Hardie stopped production of asbestos products. However, by this time, many truck drivers had already delivered thousands of tonnes of asbestos throughout the Auckland area. The lethal effects of asbestos became known in 1975. In November 1997, housing developers, while excavating, uncovered the toxic contaminant in the soil, initially found at the 25 Hilltop Road subdivision but centred around five heavily contaminated properties on Rakaia Rise. The residents complained that they were not warned of the contamination when they brought their properties. They protested that their health and that of their children could be at long-term risk. Residents’ actions groups were established to lobby local politicians and the national media.

2 EVALUATION OF ASBESTOS EXTENT AND ITS IMPACTS

3.4 General
An inquiry followed to investigate how the asbestos was dumped in the East Tamaki-Flat Bush area, establish the council’s responsibilities and suggest remedies. In 2001, the Government issued a report from the local government and environment select committee. Amongst other things, the committee report recommends that the Manukau City Council undertake the following: * offer help to Flat Bush property owners wanting their properties tested for asbestos contamination, * remove the asbestos contaminating the Rakaia Rise properties as long as it can be done without releasing further fibres into the air, * undertake the same sort of remedial work it would expect of any future developer, and * include restrictions or conditions to regulate and control any excavation on contaminated...
tracking img