Consumer Perception Process

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Consumer Behaviour

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Consumer Behaviour

Dropbox assignment 1
Teacher: Mr. Perry Broome
Duncan Cijsouw (0617745)

10/05/2011
Dropbox assignment 1
Teacher: Mr. Perry Broome
Duncan Cijsouw (0617745)

10/05/2011

Consumer perception process
Part 1a
This is about the way consumers perceive a product or a brand. This recognition of a product or brand is based on two different things: Learning and Perception. These two phrases mean something completely different, but are in fact closely connected when it comes to consumer perception. Learning

Learning is a change in behavior from the interaction between a person and a stimulus. This can be intentional or unintentional. The difference between this is that intentional learning, on the one hand, means that the consumer is set out to learn information devoted to a certain subject. The learning is acquired by a search for information. For example when I bought a new snowboard last year. Instead of buying a random board, I first did a lot of research about which one would be best for me. I was intentionally learning about the differences in snowboards. Unintentional learning, on the other hand, is about how consumers sense and react to the environment. The learning is acquired without much effort. People will react differently to influences from their environment and will create a preference to certain brands or products. For example, we may experience the sales people in one store being nicer to us than those in the other. We thus may develop a preference for the one store over the other; however, if pressed, we may not be able to give a conscious explanation as to the reason for our preference. Or as shown in the example above an attractive woman in a car can give a positive effect which might persuade the customer to buy the car more easily. Perception

Perception is a consumer’s awareness and interpretation of reality. Everyday an average person sees around 2000 advertisements a day, but can only remember a few of them. This is because they are not really interested in most of these products anyways. But for example, if you are looking to buy a new car, you will probably pay more attention to car advertisements. This is called selective attention. A brand can also change its positioning strategy this way by changing their advertising campaigns a bit. The change is most of the time barely noticeable for consumers but unintentionally they will have a different image of the brand and will be more likely to buy it. An example I found about this is the advertising campaign of Marlboro in the 1950’s. Around 1950 Marlboro introduced filtered cigarettes. The sales of these cigarettes were pretty low because customers thought they were feminine and because of this very few males bought them. By launching an advertisement campaign showing tough cowboys smoking Marlboro filtered cigarettes they positioned themselves in the heads of their customers as a manlier brand again, which lead to a sales increase of 300% from $5 billion in 1955 to $20 billion in 1957. They changed the customer’s perception of the brand by only changing the picture on their advertisements. This can also lead to a mere exposure effect. Brands that you have been exposed will most of the time be preferred over brands that you do not know yet. This could lead to unethical acts though. This is because people will more easily buy products from brands that they know. An example is chicken nuggets from McDonalds. Customers do not really want to know how these are made because they just want to keep buying them for the taste, not the product information. But this doesn’t count for all kinds of products in my opinion. If customers want to buy a fur coat they can just as well buy a fake version instead. It’s most of the time cheaper and they know that animals haven’t been killed to make them.

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