CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR REPORT

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lCh-1 Introduction to the Topic
CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR
Consumer behaviour is the study of how people buy, what they buy, when they buy and why they buy. It blends elements from psychology, sociology, socio psychology, anthropology and economics. It attempts to understand the buyer decision making process, both individually and in groups. It studies characteristics of individual consumers such as demographics, psychographics, and behavioural variables in an attempt to understand people's wants. It also tries to assess influences on the consumer from groups such as family, friends, reference groups, and society in general. Possibly the most challenging concept in marketing deals with understanding why buyers do what they do (or don’t do).  But such knowledge is critical for marketers since having a strong understanding of buyer Behaviour will help shed light on what is important to the customer and also suggest the important influences on customer decision-making.  Using this information, marketers can create marketing programs that they believe will be of interest to customers.  Factors affecting how customers make decisions are extremely complex.  Buyer Behaviour is deeply rooted in psychology with dashes of sociology thrown in just to make things more interesting.  Since every person in the world is different, it is impossible to have simple rules that explain how buying decisions are made.  But those who have spent many years analyzing customer activity have presented us with useful “guidelines” in how someone decides whether or not to make a purchase.  In fact, pick up any textbook that examines customer Behaviour and each seems to approach it from a different angle.  The perspective we take is to touch on just the basic concepts that appear to be commonly accepted as influencing customer Behaviour.  There are four main applications of consumer Behaviour:

* The most obvious is for marketing strategy—i.e., for making better marketing campaigns. For example, by understanding that consumers are more receptive to food advertising when they are hungry, we learn to schedule snack advertisements late in the afternoon. By understanding that new products are usually initially adopted by a few consumers and only spread later, and then only gradually, to the rest of the population, we learn that (1) companies that introduce new products must be well financed so that they can stay afloat until their products become a commercial success and (2) it is important to please initial customers, since they will in turn influence many subsequent customers’ brand choices. * A second application is public policy. In the 1980s, Accutane, a near miracle cure for acne, was introduced. Unfortunately, Accutane resulted in severe birth defects if taken by pregnant women. Although physicians were instructed to warn their female patients of this, a number still became pregnant while taking the drug. To get consumers’ attention, the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) took the step of requiring that very graphic pictures of deformed babies be shown on the medicine containers. * Social marketing involves getting ideas across to consumers rather than selling something. Marty Fishbone, a marketing professor, went on sabbatical to work for the Centres for Disease Control trying to reduce the incidence of transmission of diseases through illegal drug use. The best solution, obviously, would be if we could get illegal drug users to stop. This, however, was deemed to be infeasible. It was also determined that the practice of sharing needles was too ingrained in the drug culture to be stopped. As a result, using knowledge of consumer attitudes, Dr. Fishbein created a campaign that encouraged the cleaning of needles in bleach before sharing them, a goal that was believed to be more realistic. * As a final benefit, studying consumer Behaviour should make us better consumers. Common sense suggests, for example, that if you buy a 64 liquid...
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