Constitution of Uk

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As Pryor mentioned, a Constitution “is a written document setting out a system of founding principles according to which a nation is constituted and governed, and, most particularly, by which is sovereign power is located” (Pryor, 2008, pp. 4). Therefore, constitutions limit the governments’ powers, protect people’s rights, and infer the legitimacy of the state. The constitution of Great Britain hasn’t been brought together into a single document like other commonwealth countries such as France – it is not written or codified. Britain’s constitution is made up of common laws, Parliament acts, and customs and traditions. But Britain does have some important constitutional documents from the Act of Parliament such as the Magna Carta (1215): “which aimed to protect citizens against arbitrary power and guaranteed the right to a fair trial and trial by jury” (Barnett & Diamantides, 2007, p.33), and Bill of Rights (1689): “the Lords and Commons, previous to the coronation of King William and Queen Mary had framed a bill which contained a declaration of the rights which they claimed in behalf of the people, and was in consequence called the Bill of Rights” (Jean Louis de Lolme, 1853, pp. 50). Britain has no written constitution because “the country has been stable for too long. The governing elites of many European nations, such as France and Germany, have been forced to draw up constitutions in response to popular revolt or war” (Morris, 2008). In addition, since the current situation has been working well for a long time, why to change it? Besides, the constitution can be changed or adjusted by acts of Parliament, or by an agreement. Since it is flexible, effective amendments in laws can be easily made. A.V. Dicey explained that a flexible constitution is “one under which every law of every description can legally be changed with the same ease and in the same manner by one and the same body” (Dicey, 1885, pp.65). It is also very valid for Great Britain not to have a...
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