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The Constitution: Analyzing the reasons behind the creation of th...

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The Constitution: Analyzing the reasons behind the creation of the United States Constitution as well as how it was created.

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  • September 22, 2005
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Repeatedly, Americans have turned to a history of laws and actions in the course of inestimable social and political struggles. Similar to every piece of time, the history of the United States from 1781 to 1789 was a fundamental part of its past and future. This period of time was crucial to the structure and function of the country; great issues both blunt and practical were seldom resolved in political debates, thus there was a demand for change. The scrutiny of human society where citizens argued publicly and aggressively to the question of whether or not people could govern themselves was the turning point that led to a document of rules and rights. Through compromises, conventions, developments of government systems, and ratifications of just and unmerited laws, the Constitution of the United Stated was formed.

Over the years, the United States, just like any other country, has modified its type of governing and the laws set for its citizens. A state is a territory in which people live under an organized government and have the power to make laws. The states were highly addressed under a plan of confederation. This plan ultimately became known as the Articles of Confederation. These articles had their pros and cons. They stated that the government would be a unicameral, or one-house, congress, which would hold a certain privilege of power and the states, had their obligations to the articles and congress. There were, however, weaknesses in the Articles, such as: no executives to enforce acts of congress, no national court system, and congress deemed powerless in some foreign and domestic acts. Such weaknesses concerned the government and people. The Articles created a government unable to deal with America's troubles. In attempt to form a more effective national government, a meeting was called in Philadelphia in hope for a movement of change.

Following the Philadelphia conference, the Virginia and New Jersey conventions brought forth new ideas and put...