Conjunctivitis: Causes and Cures

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  • Topic: Allergic conjunctivitis, Conjunctiva, Conjunctivitis
  • Pages : 1 (318 words )
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  • Published : March 5, 2013
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Kathryn Meyers
Period 2 HPA
Extra Credit
1-25-12

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the eye/eyes. It is caused when the conjunctiva (a thin layer that covers the sclera) is exposed to bacteria or allergens. The most common type of conjunctivitis is known as pink eye and is cause by virus. Viral conjunctivitis can occur in one or two of a person’s eyes. It tends to cause a watery discharge while conjunctivitis caused by bacteria causes a thicker discharge. Both are transmitted to another eye in the discharge. Children are primarily affected by bacterial conjunctivitis, possibly because it is more transferable in a location like school. People are at a higher risk of developing conjunctivitis if they use contacts. Those who come in contact with something they are allergic to are highly susceptible to this inflammation too. It is very likely for people to have “bloodshot” eyes if they are exposed to something they have an allergy.

If someone’s eyes are bloodshot, itch, feel rough, and release discharge, they may have conjunctivitis. If this lasts for more than twelve hours, it is important for them to make a doctors appointment so they can be treated. A doctor might prescribe antibiotic eye drops or creams for bacterial conjunctivitis. Viral conjunctivitis usually just goes away with time. If the conjunctivitis is allergy induced, a doctor may advise their patient to take an antihistamine or anti-inflammatory prescription. Although treatment isn’t too extensive it is best to avoid conjunctivitis in the first place. To prevent conjunctivitis one should: change their pillowcases often, not share eye makeup or towels, take proper care of contacts, keep eye touching at a minimum, and wash hands regularly. Conjunctivitis may be easily transmitted but if precautions are taken, it can be prevented.

SOURCES:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/pink-eye/DS00258/DSECTION=treatments%2Dand%2Ddrugs

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002005/...
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