Conjunctions: Grammatical Conjunction and Squid Eyeball Stew

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  • Topic: Grammatical conjunction, Dependent clause, Clause
  • Pages : 4 (737 words )
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  • Published : October 15, 2011
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* A conjunction is a joiner, a word that connects (conjoins) parts of a sentence. * You can use a conjunction to link words, phrases, and clauses, Examples:
I ate the pizza and the pasta.
Call the movers when you are ready.
Coordinating conjunctions
* A coordinating conjunction joins parts of a sentence (for example words or independent clauses) that are grammatically equal or similar. A coordinating conjunction shows that the elements it joins are similar in importance and structure * And, but, for, nor, or, so, and yet—these are the seven coordinating conjunctions. To remember all seven, you might want to learn the acronym: * FANBOYS.

* With verbs
* With adjective
* With complete ideas
* with nouns and pronouns
-The bowl of squid eyeball stew is hot and delicious.
-The squid eyeball stew is so thick that you can eat it with a fork or spoon. -Rocky, my orange tomcat, loves having his head scratched but hates getting his claws trimmed. Each coordinate conjunction indicates a different relationship between the words that they connect. F= for, is used to explain because (inference)

A= and, is used to explain similar ideas (addition)
N= nor, is used to explain alternatives. Think of the “n” as not. B= but, is used to explain opposite ideas. (contrast) O= or, is used to explain alternatives (choices)
Y= yet, is used to show a contrast
S= so, is used to explain a cause and effect (result)

* comes at the beginning of a Subordinate (or Dependent) Clause and establishes the relationship between the dependent clause and the rest of the sentence. It also turns the clause into something that depends on the rest of the sentence for its meaning. * sometimes called a dependent word or subordinator

Common Subordinating Conjunctions
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