Conflict Management

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STUDENT DETAILS

ACAP Student ID: 195627
Name: Tyrone Jones
Course: Graduate Certificate In Counselling
ASSESSMENT DETAILS

Unit/Module: Conflict Management

Educator: Kat Howell

Assessment Name: Write an essay discussing the notion that the way in which individuals behave in conflict can lead to the peaceful resolution of disputes

Assessment Number: 1

Term & Year: 3/2012

Word Count: 2620
DECLARATION
I declare that this assessment is my own work, based on my own personal research/study . I also declare that this assessment, nor parts of it, has not been previously submitted for any other unit/module or course, and that I have not copied in part or whole or otherwise plagiarised the work of another student and/or persons. I have read the ACAP Student Plagiarism and Academic Misconduct Policy and understand its implications. I also declare, if this is a practical skills assessment, that a Client/Interviewee Consent Form has been read and signed by both parties, and where applicable parental consent has been obtained Conflicts occur for a multitude of reasons with the complexity of the conflict often reflecting the “interests, emotions and values” (Condliffe, 2008, p.9) held by the individuals or groups involved in the conflict. While one may immediately think of the negative outcomes that are linked with a conflict such as the breakdown in a relationship, the reality is that not all conflicts end in turmoil. The final result of a conflict will depend on the conflict management approach that individuals use to present their viewpoint and whether they take the opportunity to listen to the opinion of the other party involved in the conflict. It is unfortunate that within many parts of society including homes, schools, places of work, governments and global organisations that the more destructive approaches to solving conflict are easily evident. This paper will note how the behaviour of individuals can lead to the peaceful resolution of disputes. It will identify the most common approaches to conflict; aggressive, passive and assertive behaviour and will analyse how each of these approaches lead to a positive or negative outcome to resolve conflict. Throughout this discussion it will be argued that assertive behaviour is the best approach to use when solving conflict as it allows for open ended questioning, reflective listening, empathy, negotiating and the managing of one’s emotions so that in the end both sides of the conflict come out with a win. Conflicts normally arise due to the fact that we want something to happen the way we would like it to (Levin, 1985). The human body functions in such a manner that it has a natural response to conflict (Eunson, 2007) so that when everything is going our way our body is calm and relaxed. However when conflict occurs and our needs or wants are under threat of not being met our body moves into survival mode which triggers the “fight or flight” response (Levin, 1985). The physical symptoms that are evident during the fight or flight response include; rapid heartbeat, trembling hands, increase in adrenaline and sweating (Kotev, 2012). In essence the body provides the energy to those parts of the body that will allow one to either escape what is threatening the individual or the strength that they need to defend off an attack. However, whether one is fighting or fleeing from a threat, the individual’s thoughts become more concerned with who is right or wrong rather than the wants or needs of the two conflicting sides whilst at the same time a disconnection from one’s feelings takes place (Levin, 1985). The final result of either approach is going to be detrimental when trying to solve a conflict as each...
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