Conflict in Literature

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Imagine yourself sitting in class, ridiculously bored. You are reading a novel when you suddenly lose control of yourself and fall asleep. Although your teacher probably finds the obnoxious snoring very beautiful, she awakens you with a punitive tone and tells you to keep reading. "What could be missing from this excessively long book?" you ask yourself; conflict is missing. Conflict in literature provides a way to enrich any piece of fiction or non-fiction writing, it keeps you guessing. Conflict truly gives the reader a reason for each eagerly turned page. The definition of the one word, conflict, creates much controversy because there are ultimately an infinite number of interpretations. From internal to external, or physical to psychological, we love to read about it and relate to it. Without conflict, literature and history would not have such an impact on our lives today.

Internal conflict demonstrates man versus himself; a struggle within oneself that may have an external impetus. Mitch Albom, the author of The Five People You Meet in Heaven, writes about the main character and the internal guilt he feels for not succeeding in saving a young girl. In his desperate attempt to rescue her from a fire, Eddie fails and falls short of his personal expectations of his insufficient life. This strife proves so difficult that he carries it with him into his afterlife, where he finally finds relief from the agony he had so long felt. Struggle of this nature demonstrates the unsolved imperfections we have within ourselves, wanting to live up to the idea of Fitzsimmons 2 strength and great achievement that our society exhibits. In life, people around you can arouse the battle of internal conflict.

In many cases we can be let down and disappointed by the people you admire. When you put love into your relationship with a person, you being to respect them and adore the characteristics they behold. In the way Hamlet is dismayed by his mothers secretly philandering...
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