Conflict Essay

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Conflict Essay

Manhood: living high, living without regret, living in a state of no concern but leadership. Throughout the whole play Walter wants manhood. However, in the late 1950s whites achieved more manhood than African Americans because society put them down making it hard for the men of the house to earn money and support a family. But Walter wants to prove society wrong. He wants to achieve manhood like his father. In order to make money and achieve manhood in “A Raisin in the Sun” written by Lorraine Hansberry, Walter wants to own a liquor store and will do almost anything to get what he wants.

From the beginning of the play Walter craves to own a liquor store so that he can prove his manhood. On Friday, Walter and his wife, Ruth, are in the Younger apartment. Walter and Ruth fight about Walter’s dream of owning a liquor store. Walter’s plans are to own it with his two buddies, Willy Harris and Bobo. Walter tries to use Ruth’s help to persuade Mama into giving Walter the insurance money from his father’s life insurance so he can achieve his dreams. Walter smooth talks his wife to say to his mother, “You been thinkin’ bout that deal Walter Lee so interested in, bout the [liquor] store and all”(33). Walter wants his wife to persuade his mother into giving him the money so that he can own a liquor store. He believes that Ruth has influence over his mother. Ruth has the best chance at persuading Mama into giving Walter the money to start his liquor store. When Walter earns the money he can step into his fathers shoes and become a man.

Even though Walter wants to own a liquor store, his mother will not give him the $10,000 for multiple reasons. On Saturday morning, right after the insurance check arrives, Walter comes into the Younger apartment demanding to be heard by Mama. When Walter starts yelling, Mama sets him straight by telling him her decision, “I don’t ‘low no yellin in this house, Walter Lee. . . and there ain’t goin to be no...
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