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Concussions Research

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Concussions
Every year “hundred of thousands college and high school student athletes receive sport related concussions” (Meadows 107-108). Not only do the athletes who play the hard hitting contact sports such as football and hockey receive concussions, the basketball players and soccer players receive them as well. Even though most of the concussions received were mild or grade 1 concussion “athletes still receive severe symptoms due to being able to participate too soon” (Solomos 2435-2436). In order to protect college and high school athletes, colleges and high schools have to take concussions more seriously and adopt new safety guidelines for concussions injuries.

It is necessary for athletes to know the dangers of concussions. A concussion happen when an “impact to the head makes the brain move around in the skull” (Vance A36-A38). Due to the force of the impact concussions can cause minor or major head trauma. There are three different stages or grades of concussions “A minor concussion or grade one concussion may involve being dazed, head ringing, a minor headache, and a very brief loss of consciousness. A more severe concussion such as a grade 2 concussion may cause being blacked out, confusion, a pounding headache, and blurred vision. The most server concussion or grade 3 concussion may cause being blacked out, nausea or vomiting, loss of short term memory, and saying the same thing over and over”(Cunha 581-585). The most dangerous symptoms occur when a player is cleared to play before he/she has fully recovered from their concussion. When an athlete is cleared to play before he/she has fully recovered that is when death can occur.

Not only are concussions common in college sports but concussions are more common and more dangerous in high school sports. In an experiment done by American Family Physician writer Richard Sadovsky found out many interesting facts about college and high school athletes who suffer from concussions....