Concord Hymn Analysis

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"Concord Hymn: Sung at the Completion of the Concord Monument," by Ralph Waldo Emerson, is obviously about the first battle of the American Revolution, which occurred in Concord. The bridge in the first line was apparently undeveloped when the battle first took place. It has a connection to North Bridge, where the battle of the war first began. The second line refers to the American flag waving in the wind, which is being held by the revolutionaries. The third line refers to the fact that most of the revolutionaries were not trained warriors but everyday farmers who stood ready for battle. The phrase "the shot heard round the world" expresses the famous shot that began the war, and how a colonial nation revolted against the British government, which is one of the first times in history.

The next line talks about how it has been a long time since the British government has fired a gun. Line six is similar to five, which says that the Americans have also waited a long time until a gun was raised. Line seven talks about how it has been a long time since the battle on the famous bridge, and time has worn down the bridge. Line eight says how all the remnants of the bridge are headed to the sea, where they will disappear forever.

There is a gathering for a monument on the bank of the stream according to line nine. Line ten talks about the placement of the monument to remember those involved, so their actions will always be remembered as it is proposed in line eleven. Line twelve just says that they (the people who put the monument) hope that people in the future also remember the battle and those involved.

In line thirteen, Emerson is talking to God, and in line fourteen, he thanks him for the courage of the men who have helped to free the American people. According to line sixteen, he asks that the monument is spared from weathering and the ware of time that occurs, so the monument is always there. H finishes by describing this memorial as a shaft, which is...
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