Concepts & Values

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Name:SHINELLE S. CUNNINGHAM

Question:

Explain with examples the following concepts and values.
a. Fairness and Equity
b. Power and Authority
c. Individualism and Collectivism
d. Rights and Responsibilities
e. Integrity and Trust

Most definitions of industrial relations imply a certain shortcoming or inadequacy. For instance, Michael Salmon’s suggestion, after much examination of the submissions of others, that “it is possible” to define industrial relations as “a set of phenomena, operating both within and outside the workplace, concerned with determining and regulating the employment relationship”. In my shared opinion, industrial relations is arguably the “Cinderella” branch or aspect of management, which overtime has emerged with its own high degree of importance. Many reasons surround the emerging of industrial relations as a subject matter and operational activity, both at the organizational level and academic level. Such as, the cost associated with disruptions and dislocations in production processes and systems over time as result of misunderstanding and mishandling of industrial conflict. In industrial relations, there are concepts (abstract ideas) which require subjective, value judgements (based on moral and ethical) principles for which there are no universally accepted criteria. (Salamon, 2000 p 74) Some of these concepts are; fairness/equity, power/authority, individualism/collectivism, rights/responsibilities and integrity/trust. Industrial relations has to do with the individual worker and groups of workers, variously constituted and defined, and their interfacing with other individuals and groups at the workplace.

The concept of Fairness/Equity has always been raising eye borrow with questions like; A fair day’s wages for a fair day’s work? But wat is a fair day’s work? It is important for managers to recognize that while people are not equal, every empolyee is entitled to equal oppurtunity. Its equally important to recognize the role your personal biases, however subtle, play in influencing the perseptions others form about your actions and behaviors. In decision making pertaining to an employee performance, capabilities, and potiential, some would say that asking yourself these questions, it may assist with the outcome: How much of this is about the employee, and how much is about me? Does this employee deserve the benefit of the doubt? An extra push? Under what circumstances am I making this decision? Is the decision based totally on merit? Whom else have I considered? What made me decide in favor of one employee over the other? Do I like or not like this employee? How are my biasness affecting my decision?This is not to suggest that you list your biases and send a them in a memo to HR, of course. Take for instance, a cashier that was hired in a prominent wholesale distributing company, under three months probation before becoming permanant. Then dismissng her contract within one month witout a fair and appropriate performance apprasial. This concept of fairness/equity, underlies the entire conduct of Industrial Relations and is most frequently related with considerations of pay and dismissals. The concept is so fundamental to IR that the IRA commands the court to use it in the determination of cases like this one before us. The Court can exercise its power by Section 10 (3) of the IRA: Notwithstanding anything in this Act or in any other rule of law to the contrary. Fairness is a relative and variable concept to examin the conduct of human relationships it is about being free from favoritism and therefore equality of treatment is expected. Look at procedural fairness in disciplinary matters. The principles of natural justice are used. These include the right to a fair trial. Thus she is persumed innocent until proven guilty. She also has the right to appeal any decision against her. There are different meanings of fairness. Think...
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