Concept and Nature

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The concept of nature in English and Kazakh literature
The content:
1. Introduction
Chapter 1. Concept- a notion or statement of an idea
2.1 A concept is a fundamental category of existence.
2.2 Сoncepts as mandated by a particular mental theory about the state of the world. 2.3 A concept is a common feature or characteristic
2.4 The notion of sense as identical to the notion of concept

1. A general idea derived or inferred from specific instances or occurrences. 2. Something formed in the mind; a thought or notion. See Synonyms at idea. 3. A scheme; a plan: "began searching for an agency to handle a new restaurant concept"(ADWEEK). 1. an idea, esp an abstract idea the concepts of biology

2. (Philosophy) Philosophy a general idea or notion that corresponds to some class of entities and that consists of the characteristic or essential features of the class 3. (Philosophy) Philosophy

a.  the conjunction of all the characteristic features of something b.  a theoretical construct within some theory
c.  a directly intuited object of thought
d.  the meaning of a predicate
4. (Engineering / Automotive Engineering) (modifier) (of a product, esp a car) created as an exercise to demonstrate the technical skills and imagination of the designers, and not intended for mass production or sale [from Latin conceptum something received or conceived, from concipere to take in, conceive] A notion or statement of an idea, expressing how something might be done or accomplished, that may lead to an accepted procedure. concept

noun idea, view, image, theory, impression, notion, conception, hypothesis, abstraction,conceptualization She added that the concept of arranged marriages is misunderstood in the west.

World English Dictionary
concept  (ˈkɒnsɛpt) |
 |
— n|
1.|  idea, especially an abstract idea: the concepts of biology| 2.| philosophy  a general idea or notion that corresponds to some classof entities and hat consists of the characteristic or essentialfeatures of the class| 3.| .philosophy|

 | a. the conjunction of all the characteristic features of something|  | b. a theoretical construct within some theory|
 | c. a directly intuited object of thought|
 | d. the meaning of a predicate|
4.| ( modifier ) (of a product, esp a car) created as an exercise todemonstrate the technical skills and imagination of the designers,and not intended for mass production or sale|  |
[C16: from Latin conceptum something received or conceived, fromconcipere  to take in, conceive ]

A. In general usage the term mainly denotes 'idea' or 'notion'. It is envisaged as an abstract or psychological thing presupposing conscious minds which at least potentially 'have' the concept, i.e., understand it, operate with it, apply it, etc. In philosophy and the social sciences (and other sciences too) concepts enter as (a) the most general tools of inquiry as such and as (b) the content or object of some specific inquiries, notably in comparative studies. What follows refers principally to (a) rather than (b). The nature of concepts, and their relation to the things 'of which they are the concepts', and to the minds which use or contemplate them, are among the most hotly disputed subject in philosophy. The present definition is not intended to prejudge or settle any of these issues, even if limitations of space make it appear to do so.

B. Defined as an aspect of thought, a concept is a kind of unit in terms of which one thinks; a unit smaller than a judgement, proposition, or theory, but one which necessarily enters into these. In an assertion, something is predicated of a concept, and the predicate itself can generally be re-described as a concept. At the same time, however, the concept is by no means an ultimate or indivisible unit, for concepts can be augmented or diminished by addition or subtraction of some feature. (For instance, one...
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