Concept Analysis: Resilience

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Resilience: A Concept Analysis
The concept resilience has been the interest of many disciplines over the years, and is utilized by all people at some point in their lives. Concepts are building blocks that construct theories. A concept analysis will clarify the meaning, theoretical and operational definitions of the concept, for use in theory or research (Walker & Avant, 2011). The research on resiliency has increased and today, policy and practice stakeholders have interest on its impact on health, well-being, and quality of life (Zimmerman, 2005). The purpose of this concept of analysis is to develop an operational definition of the theoretical concept of resilience. This will allow readers to understand or “get inside the concept”, to understand its workings (Walker & Avant, 2011), and apply resilience to evidence-based practice. Nursing by nature is a profession subject to a high degree of stress. The concept resilience illustrates a process whereby individuals bounce back from an adverse event and move on with their lives. Conflict in the workplace often leads to adversity causing stress in many new graduate nurses. According to the United Nations and World Health Organization, workplace stress has become a worldwide epidemic (Collins, 2006). Interpersonal conflict at work is an international workplace stressor, which has become a threat to the nursing profession here in the United States (Pines et al., 2011). Research suggests the emergence of resilience in the nurses is a retention factor for nurses facing workplace conflict; however, new nurses are often underprepared to manage this stress. In order for nurse educators to prepare students for conflict resolution and build resiliency, they need to have a better understanding of the psychological traits of resilience (Pines et al., 2011). The Center for the American Nurses (2008), states complexity and adversities of the current healthcare environment requires resilience in nurses. New nurses who implore resilience are more likely to succeed in healthcare, despite workplace adversities. Review of Literature

Resilience is derived from the Latin word resilire, meaning to rebound or recoil (Haper, 2012), and possess many overlapping definition. In the physical sciences, resiliency refers to the ability of a material to resume its natural shape after experiencing affects by the application of forces (Whitson & Ramirez-Marquez, 2009). Economic resilience is defined as the responses to disasters that enable individuals and communities to avoid potential loss (Rose, 2004). Educational resilience refers to the likelihood of success in academia, despite environmental adversities (Waxman, Gray, & Padron, 2003). The Business Dictionary (2012) defines resilience in terms of a material to resume its original size and shape, or the ability of equipment to absorb the impact of failure to continue to provide an acceptable level of service. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary (2012) and The American Heritage Dictionary (2000) both define resilience as the ability to recover after a change. A constant theme noted in all definitions of resilience is an ability to recover or rebound despite adversity or change. The concept resilience is used throughout many disciplines, however it emerged a theoretical research topic in 1980 from the studies of children of schizophrenic mothers (Matsen, Best, & Garmenzy, 1990). Matsen et al. (1990) illustrated children with a schizophrenic parent, subjected to situations that negatively affect childhood development, thrived well and were competent in academic achievement. This began the evolution to understand and define traits of resilience in individuals. The historical development of the concept resilience consists of two roots of construct; the psychological aspects of coping, and the physiological aspects of stress (Tusaie & Dyer, 2004). Researchers began to focus on the understanding of protective...
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