Concentration Affects the Rate of Oxygen Production When Raw Liver (Catalyse), and Hydrogen Peroxide Is Mixed

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 177
  • Published : April 6, 2008
Open Document
Text Preview
Preliminary Experiment (4% yeast concentration)

Hydrogen peroxide volume – 5 cm3
Water Volume -0 cm3
Concentration Volume- 20 vols

Time in SecondsVolume of O2 (cm3)
Experiment 1Experiment 2Average
30959494.5
60100100100
90100100100
120100100100
150100100100
180100100100

Modifications

The results from my preliminary experiment show that 100 cm3 of oxygen has been produced in the first 30 seconds.. This reaction is far too quick and will prevent me from analysing the effects different substrate concentrations have on enzymes if I decide to continue. I will therefore lower my yeast concentration to 1%. I will also measure the volume of oxygen produced every 15 seconds, instead of every 30 seconds. This will make my results more reliable and allow me to analyse my results to a higher degree.

Precautions

To ensure that my experiment is accurate I will:

Keep the hydrogen peroxide in the brown bottle to stop it reacting with the sunlight. •Try to minimise the handling of my equipment to prevent them warming up. •Make sure that the bung has been placed correctly every time to stop oxygen escaping. •Push the syringe in and out several times to make sure that no substance is left in the syringe.

Safety: Hydrogen peroxide is corrosive. To prevent accidents wear goggles and a laboratory coat. Also wipe up any spills immediately.

Results

Hydrogen peroxide volume – 5 cm3
Water Volume -0 cm3
Concentration Volume- 20 vols

Time in SecondsVolume of Oxygen O2 (cm3)
Experiment 1Experiment 2Average
15141514.5
30262726.5
45404040
60535252.5
75656464.5
90747474
105808080
120858585
135908788.5
150929091
165949393.5
180949494
195969495
210969495
Hydrogen peroxide volume – 4 cm3
Water Volume -1 cm3
Concentration Volume- 16 vols
Time in SecondsVolume of Oxygen O2 (cm3)
Experiment 1Experiment 2Average
15111814.5
30222423
45303331.5
60384139.5
75454947
90505452
105545856
120576058.5
135606361.5
150616563
165636664.5
180646765.5
195656766
210666766.5
225666766.5
240666766.5
Hydrogen Peroxide Volume – 3 cm3
Water Volume – 2 cm3
Concentration Volume – 12 vols

Time in SecondsVolume of Oxygen O2 (cm3)
Experiment 1Experiment 2Experiment 3Average
1510121312.5
3020222423
4527252927.5
6033303331.5
7536343635
9041374038.5
10543404140.5
12045404241
13547404442
15050404542.5
16550404545.5
18050404545.5

Hydrogen Peroxide Volume – 2 cm3
Water Volume – 3 cm3
Concentration Volume – 8 vols
Time in SecondsVolume of Oxygen O2 (cm3)
Experiment 1Experiment 2Average
15101211
30182019
45222423
60262626
75282928.5
90313131
105333232.5
120353334
135363535.5
150363535.5
165363535.5

Hydrogen Peroxide Volume – 1 cm3
Water Volume – 4 cm3
Concentration Volume – 4 vols
Time in SecondsVolume of Oxygen O2 (cm3)
Experiment 1Experiment 2Average
158119.5
30141615
45162018
60192220.5
75202422
90212523
105222523.5
120222624
135232725
150232725
165232725

Hydrogen Peroxide Volume – 0 cm3
Water Volume – 5 cm
Concentration Volume – 0 vols
Time in SecondsVolume of Oxygen O2 (cm3)
Experiment 1Experiment 2Average
15777
30777
45777
60777
75777

The graph shows that the higher the concentration of hydrogen peroxide, the higher the amount of oxygen gas given off. In the highest substrate concentration, (20 vols), 52.5 cm3 of oxygen gas is given off.

The results on my graph between the highest and lowest concentrations show a similar trend; there is a sharp rise at the amount of oxygen given off for the 1st minute, then there is a slow levelling off.

My graph shows that after approximately 135 seconds the lines begin to level off. This indicates saturation. Saturation occurs when...
tracking img