Computers in Elementary Classrooms: Good or Bad?

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Since the passing of the Vocational Education Act in 1963, the use of technology in schools has been an idea supported by many. Students are given time to learn through a computer-based learning system, often the internet, where they learn through a process called e-learning. Though it’s not often thought about, the use of computers beginning at the primary level has an influence on the students’ discourse. While using computers as compared to having a teacher giving students information, the ability to ask questions on a topic is somewhat changed. The formation of how to ask a question is affected as well as the conclusions to be drawn from the computer-based assignment. In Kindergartners’ Conversations in a Computer-Based Technology Classroom, Fisher placed talk among children into three categories and argued that exploratory, the final of the three, held a potential for learning and expanded students realm of thinking. There are a lot of negative aspects placed on technology these days but most people don’t understand how much technology in the right situations can be more beneficial than detrimental. In the primary school setting, students don’t think about emailing and typing in improper English. That comes with the environment in which the student uses the computer and it is proven that e-learning and computer-based learning can be very beneficial in the primary stages of learning. In such settings as a homeschooling environment, e-learning and CD-ROMs are used almost every day and the main source of learning. According to Julie Knapp, e-learning is the preferred way for students to do independent work and study higher level materials. Also, it’s a better resource for those looking for a more fast paced teaching method. While all of this is true for the homeschooling environment, the issue of communication comes into play. Public school students fall prey to communicating orally a lot throughout a typical school day, leaving plenty of...
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