Computer Integrated Manufacturing

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CONTENTS :

INTRODUCTION... 02
PRINCIPLE OF CIM... 03
COMPONENTS OF CIM... 04
OPERATING PROCESS... 07
FIELDS OF APPLICATION... 13
BENEFITS... 15
CHALLENGES... 17
CONCLUSION... 19
REFERENCES... 20

INTRODUCTION :

Computer Integrated Manufacturing, known as CIM, is the phrase used to describe the complete automation of a manufacturing plant, with all processes functioning under computer control and digital information tying them together. CIM is an example of the implementation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in manufacturing. This starts with computer aided design, followed by computer aided manufacture, followed by automated storage and distribution. One integrated computer system controls all that happens.  Through the integration of computers, manufacturing can be faster and less error-prone, although the main advantage is the ability to create automated manufacturing processes.  In a CIM system functional areas such as design, analysis, planning, purchasing, cost accounting, inventory control, and distribution are linked through the computer with factory floor functions such as materials handling and management, providing direct control and monitoring of all the operations. It was promoted by machine tool manufacturers in the 1980's and the Society for Manufacturing Engineers (CASA/SME).

PRINCIPLE OF CIM :

 CIM relies on closed-loop control processes, based on real-time input from sensors. It is also known as flexible design and manufacturing. The output of the system is fed back through a sensor measurement to the reference value. The controller then takes the error between the reference and the output to change the inputs u to the system under control. This kind of controller is a closed-loop controller or feedback controller. This is called a single-input-single-output (SISO) control system. Part of the system involves flexible manufacturing,where the factory can be quickly modified to produce different products, or where the volume of products can be changed quickly with the aid of computers. In the CIM system some processes will be different. Data entry will now be stored in hard drives. This will allow for the manipulation and the retrieval of the data with a simple keystroke. The means by which the processing of data into the production of products will also be streamlined within hardware and software. This will allow operators to alter and enhance programs in order to improve products. The CIM system will also provide the necessary algorithms to bring all the data together. The data will then be able to intermingle with the sensor and modification components of the system.

COMPONENTS OF CIM :

CIMOSA (Computer Integrated Manufacturing Open System Architecture), is a 1990s European proposal for an open system architecture for CIM developed by the AMICE Consortium as a series of ESPRIT projects. The goal of CIMOSA was to help companies to manage change and integrate their facilities and operations to face world wide competition. It provides a consistent architectural framework for both enterprise modelling and enterprise integration as required in CIM environments. The heart of computer integrated manufacturing is CAD/CAM. Computer-aided design(CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing(CAM) systems are essential to reducing cycle times in the organization. CAD/CAM is a high technology integrating tool between design and manufacturing. CAD techniques make use of group technology to create similar geometries for quick retrieval. Electronic files replace drawing rooms. CAD/CAM integrated systems provide design/drafting, planning and scheduling, and fabrication capabilities. CAD provides the electronic...
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