Computer Images and Sounds

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How Do Computers Represent Images and Sounds?

We all know that numbers and texts in a computer are represented by bits. For example:
00000000= 0
00000001= 1
00000010= 2 Numbers
00000011= 3

As for the text, which is also represented by bits, every letter and character is represented by using a single number. For example, if you wanted to store "hello": h = 104
e = 101
l = 108
o = 111
So it would be stored as:
104 101 108 111
But these numbers would actually be stored in bits as well.

However, audio and pictures are a little more complicated. To understand this, let us portray a relatively similar example. Let’s say we want to enter pictures inside a machine. To do this, we can break the picture into small parts which we will call pixels. Each pixel describes a small part of the picture. For example a picture could be broken into 100 × 100 pieces arranged in an array. On the other hand, let’s call the number of parts we get, the resolution of the picture. The greater the resolution is, the more numbers represent the picture.

This justifies the given image; in which are able to identify individual pixels. It would be better to represent it using 1000 × 1000 resolution digitization, which is the common resolution for pictures to look clear. So, we must handle a million pixels in the computer to deal with a single square picture at 1,000 × 1,000 resolution.

If the image is black and white like this image, then a single bit is required to characterize each pixel; 0 for black and 1 for white. If the picture has ranges of the color gray, then we could characterize it either by a single small integer between say 0 and 15, zero for black and 15 for white, which would require 4 bits for each pixel, or by using gray values from 0 to 255, which would give a better representation and...
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