Computer Hacking

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The Effects of Cyber Hacking to the Networking Company

A
Research Paper

Submitted to:
Mrs. Calopez

Northern Negros State College of Science and Technology
Brgy.Old Sagay, Sagay City Neg.Occ

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement of the Course Writing in the Discipline

Submitted by:
Keindrec Cañete, BSIT II-A

April 04, 2013

The Effects of Cyber Hacking to the Networking Company

By:
Keindrec Cañete, BSIT II-A

To:
Mrs. Calopez

A Research Paper
April 04, 2013

I. Introduction
Unlike most computer crime / misuse areas which are clear cut in terms of actions and legalities, computer hacking is more difficult to define. Computer hacking always involves some degree of infringement on the privacy of others or damage to computer-based property such as files, web pages or software. The impact of computer hacking varies from simply being simply invasive and annoying to illegal. There is an aura of mystery that surrounds hacking, and a prestige that accompanies being part of a relatively "elite" group of individuals who possess technological savvy and are willing to take the risks required to become a true "hacker". An interesting alternative view of how hackers positively impact areas such as software development and hacker ideology is presented in Technology and Pleasure: Considering Hacking Constructive. A number of issues arise in considering hacking from the educator perspective. First, we need to consider the fact that the public perception of hackers is mixed, and that "hacking" and "being considered a hacker" can be quite appealing to students who are going through developmental periods in which they are defining themselves, as well as challenging authority and rules. There is often a Robin Hood mentality to early actions, though it is unclear exactly who "the poor" are, and how they are "being compensated". Second, the anonymity of actions which hackers perform against others often enhances the severity of actions. For example, an adolescent who would never consider picking someone's pocket or physically damaging someone else's property or home, might be quite willing to steal people's credit card numbers or destroy poorly protected business or government files, since files and credit card numbers are not tangible entities, and the damage is done anonymously. The media often presents these individuals in a glamorous light. Adolescents may fantasize about their degree of technological skills and, lacking the social skills required to be accepted well by others, move online in search of those who profess to have technological skills the student’s desire. A simple search using the term "hacker" with any search engine results in hundreds of links to illegal serial numbers, ways to download and pirate commercial software, etc. Showing this information off to others may result in the students being considered a "hacker" by their less technologically savvy friends, further reinforcing antisocial behavior. In some cases, individuals move on to programming and destruction of other individuals programs through the writing of computer viruses and Trojan horses, programs which include computer instructions to execute a hacker's attack. If individuals can successfully enter computers via a network, they may be able to impersonate an individual with high level security clearance access to files, modifying or deleting them or introducing computer viruses or Trojan horses. As hackers become more sophisticated, they may begin using sniffers to steal large amounts of confidential information, become involved in burglary of technical manuals, larceny or espionage.

II.
Computer Security

Computer hacking is a breach of computer security. It can expose sensitive user data and risk user privacy. Hacking activities expose confidential user information like personal details, social security numbers, credit card numbers, bank account data and personal photographs. User information, in the hands of...
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