Computer Crimes Ethics

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March 17, 2013
March 17, 2013

David Miller: Portrait of a White-Collar Criminal

David Miller: Portrait of a White-Collar Criminal
Christine Quiñones
business info systems with lab
Professor williams
devry university

Christine Quiñones
business info systems with lab
Professor williams
devry university

Table of Contents

How does Miller fit the profile of the average fraud perpetrator? How does he differ? How did these characteristics make him difficult to detect?...............................Page 3 Explain the three elements of the opportunity triangle (commit, conceal, convert), and discuss how Miller accomplished each when embezzling funds from Associated Communications. What specific concealment techniques did Miller use?..........Page 3 What pressures motivated Miller to embezzle? How did Miller rationalize his actions?.................................................................................................................Page 4 Miller had a framed T-shirt in his office that said, “He who dies with the most toys wins.” What does this tell you about Miller? What lifestyle red flags could have tipped off the company to the possibility of fraud?.....................................................................Page 5 Why do companies hesitate to prosecute white-collar criminals? What are the consequences of not prosecuting? How could law enforcement officials encourage more prosecution?...........................................................................................................Page 5 What could the victimized companies have done to prevent Miller’s embezzlement?.......................................................................................................Page 6

David L. Miller: Portrait of a White-Collar Criminal
Question 1:How does Miller fit the profile of the average fraud perpetrator? How does he differ? How did these characteristics make him difficult to detect? Mr. Miller is a very sad case. He has all the qualifications of a stellar employee, but those traits are only there to mask who he truly is. He fits the average profile for the average fraud perpetrator because of the following: * The vast majority of fraud perpetrators spend everything that they steal. Only a very small percentage invest the money. Mr. Miller spent all the money and thus it explains why he stole from a new employer in order to repay the prior one. * Many white-collar criminals are stellar employees until that very moment when they are caught. They are always eager, work many days and long hours and are reliable employees. * Employers viewed Mr. Miller as an honest employee and it was because of this trust that he was placed in positions of sensitivity. * Mr. Miller had the life and behaved in the manner of your average citizen and did not raise any flags. He was an educated family man with values and good psychological framework. Even though he has some of the same traits as your average fraud perpetrator, he was harder to spot because of the many ways that he differed. Mr. Miller was not unhappy nor was he vengeful towards his employer. He also had never been convicted of his prior transgressions, and there were various. Normally, most of the fraud perpetrators are first time offenders and not serial offender as Mr. Miller has proven to be. This type of character is very difficult to spot because they do not tend to stand out. White-collar criminals are very educated talented individuals and are the perfect employee. No one would think that they would be capable of such deviant behavior. These people are placed in position of trust are usually work very hard and long hours for the employee. It is sad because there are many employees who possess these traits, but are truly honest and have the company’s best interest at heart.

Question 2: Explain the three elements of the opportunity triangle (commit, conceal, convert), and discuss how Miller accomplished...
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