Complicated Relationship Between Money and Power

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Complicated Relationship Between Power and Money
Serena McNiff

Since the time when cavemen inhabited the earth, it has become human nature to want more than what one has. Before the concept of wealth was developed, humans fulfilled their needs by trading or bartering with others based on items that they needed to survive. As mankind has advanced, humans have expanded into desiring nonessential things. Money has become a medium for exchange and a payment for work, and currency is now fundamental to most life on earth. Only three percent of Americans supply their own food through farming or hunting, which reflects that a massive ninety-seven percent of American’s use money every day to purchase food.1 The amount of money one possesses culturally determines their success in life. Humans who have wealth, also have influence, because they have what people desire and are able to live the lifestyle that they want. As people believe that they need more wealth, they become slaves to money. The humans who possess wealth gain influence over money worshippers and as a result, are the most powerful in society.

The power of a country has always been grounded in its economic strength. International powers can afford to finance aggressive foreign policies with strong militaries. For example, The United States was first considered the supreme financial and world power when it replaced Great Britain during the First World War. After the devastation of the Second World War, the United States became virtually the only financial power. Being able to afford a strong military meant that the United States benefited financially from the First and Second World War and became allies with the increasingly dependent United Kingdom. During World War One, the United States used their financial leverage over Europe. President Woodrow Wilson wanted the European Countries to agree to his peace plans, described in the famous Fourteen Points. Wilson said to his advisor Colonel...
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