Competitive Intelligence

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
I.Abstract
II.Problem Statement
III.Evaluation
IV.Hypothesis
V.Procedure/Design
VI.Introduction
VII.Definition and Examples
a.Case I
b.Case II
c.Case III
VIII.Origin of Competitive Intelligence
IX.Why Collect Intelligence?
X.What is Ethical?
XI.Methods of Intelligence Collection
XII.What Resources Are Used to Collect Information
XIII.How Companies Utilized Collected Information
XIV.Keeping Companies Secrets Secret
a.Buildings
b.Communication Systems
c.Administrative
XV.Conclusion

I.ABSTRACT
Intelligence gathering is considered commonplace in corporate America. Companies struggle to maintain the high ground within a competitive marketplace. One source for maintaining an elevated position is through information gathering on competitors, better known as Competitive Intelligence (CI). Collection of this information can be accomplished through numerous means. History has shown that the collection of CI is not a new practice, only that the methods used to collect the information have evolved over the past century. Intense pressure for turning profits, winning contracts, and avoiding expensive research and development costs drive the methods used in CI collection. With an increase in CI collection, companies are required to protect themselves from inside and outside intruders.

II.PROBLEM STATEMENT
Corporate America has become oblivious to the information being divulged concerning company trade secrets. Corporate intelligence or company espionage has become an all to commonplace art form. Due to increase pressure to meet production quotas, new product markets, and an increase in stockholder wealth, corporations have changed into a “win at all costs” approach towards business. This organizational behavioral change has created misleading CEO’s, storytelling CFO’s, and cut throat high and mid-tier managers. Companies use boarder line practices to collect information on their competitors to get and stay ahead in the market environment. The ill effects of this intelligence gathering cost companies monetarily at the rate of 1 billion a year. Companies struggle to maintain the high ground within a competitive marketplace. One source for maintaining an elevated position is through information gathering on competitors, better known as Competitive Intelligence (CI). Collection of this information can be accomplished through ethical or unethical means. History has shown that the collection of CI is not a new practice, only that the methods used to collect the information have evolved over the past century. Intense pressure for turning profits, winning contracts, and avoiding expensive research and development costs drive the methods used in CI collection. With an increase in CI collection, companies are required to protect themselves from inside and outside intruders.

III.EVALUATION
Evaluation of Literature: Review scholarly articles over the past century identifying trends in competitive intelligence collection and identify possible ethical allegations posed by competitors. Articles on Ex-Boeing employees charged with corporate espionage over Lockheed documents. Steven Fink’s book, published in 2002, “Sticky Finger, managing the Global Risk of Economic Espionage.” Ira Winkler’s 1997 book, “Corporate Espionage.” The Information Management Journal’s article, “Competitive Intelligence in Action.” Business Week’s review of “Espionage in Corporate America.” Information collected from on-line resources, books, periodicals, or articles that pertain to the subject matter.

IV.HYPOTHESIS

Intense pressure for turning profits, winning contracts, and avoiding expensive research and development costs are driving the methods used in the collection of competitive intelligence. a. Independent Variables

1.Innovation
2.Market leverage
3.Emerging strategies
4.Products
5.Collection Method
6.Resources
b.Dependent Variable: Collection...
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