Competitive Advantage

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Competitive Advantage:
Question 1/2:
A competitive advantage is a position that a firm occupies in its competitive landscape. Cost advantage
Cost advantage
A firm possesses a sustainable competitive advantage when it has value-creating processes and positions that cannot be duplicated or imitated by others, that lead to the production of above normal rents, in that it provides a long-term advantage that is not easily replicated. Sources of competitive advantage:

Competitive advantage
Competitive advantage
Similar products at lower price

Differentiation advantage
Differentiation advantage
Price premium from unique products

Competitors’ gained by offering consumers greater value, either by means of lower prices or by providing greater benefits and service that justifies higher prices. Porter suggested four "generic" business strategies that could be adopted in order to gain competitive advantage. The strategies relate to the extent to which the scope of a business' activities are narrow versus broad and the extent to which a business seeks to differentiate its products. Question 3:

The differentiation and cost leadership strategies seek competitive advantage in a broad range of market or industry segments. By contrast, the differentiation focus and cost focus strategies are adopted in a narrow market or industry.

Cost leadership
With this strategy, the objective is to become the lowest-cost producer in the industry. The traditional method to achieve this objective is to produce on a large scale which enables the business to exploit economies of scale. Why is cost leadership potentially so important? Many (perhaps all) market segments in the industry are supplied with the emphasis placed on minimising costs. If the achieved selling price can at least equal (or near) the average for the market, then the lowest-cost producer will (in theory) enjoy the best profits. This strategy is usually associated with large-scale businesses offering "standard" products with relatively little differentiation that are readily acceptable to the majority of customers. Occasionally, a low-cost leader will also discount its product to maximise sales, particularly if it has a significant cost advantage over the competition and, in doing so, it can further increase its market share. A strategy of cost leadership requires close cooperation between all the functional areas of a business.  To be the lowest-cost producer, a firm is likely to achieve or use several of the following: * High levels of productivity

* High capacity utilisation
* Use of bargaining power to negotiate the lowest prices for production inputs * Lean production methods (e.g. JIT)
* Effective use of technology in the production process
* Access to the most effective distribution channels
Cost focus
Here a business seeks a lower-cost advantage in just one or a small number of market segments. The product will be basic - perhaps a similar product to the higher-priced and featured market leader, but acceptable to sufficient consumers. Such products are often called "me-too's". Differentiation focus

In the differentiation focus strategy, a business aims to differentiate within just one or a small number of target market segments. The special customer needs of the segment mean that there are opportunities to provide products that are clearly different from competitors who may be targeting a broader group of customers. The important issue for any business adopting this strategy is to ensure that customers really do have different needs and wants - in other words that there is a valid basis for differentiation - and that existing competitor products are not meeting those needs and wants. Differentiation focus is the classic niche marketing strategy.  Many small businesses are able to establish themselves in a niche market segment using this strategy, achieving higher prices than un-differentiated products through specialist...
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