Comparisons Between Cystology, Histology, and Pathology.

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  • Topic: Pathology, Anatomical pathology, Medical laboratory
  • Pages : 5 (1704 words )
  • Download(s) : 51
  • Published : March 30, 2013
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Michelle Hatton-Cowan
Professor Micah Parker
BHSR-115-01
16 March 2013
Putting the Pieces Together
While recently putting a puzzle together with my family I realized that we had a very certain way of putting it together. We had the person who laid out all the pieces and was constantly looking for the ones that went together. Another person would carefully put pieces together that the first person had laid out and make sure there were no discrepancies. The last person would oversee everyone else. They would make sure pieces were going where they should be, and everyone would report back to the main person who was overseeing everything. If one was to look at any career or field they have trained in or worked in they would see that there is a hierarchy to each position. It is one person helping the next person to figure out one main objective or goal. The Careers of a Cytologist, Histologist, and Pathologist work very closely together; so closely it’s almost like they are putting a puzzle together, in such a way one can’t just do all of the jobs but there must be someone in each area of the field to complete the main objective. Cytologists are the people working on the puzzle that lay the pieces out for the person in charge to oversee and direct them at what they should be looking for. They are “biologists who specialize in the study of formation, structure, and function of cells” (“cytology”). I like that fact that they have independent work with very little supervision. There is room for rapid job growth. A reported “14% job growth through 2018” (Tolia). I do not like that cytologist’s have major exposure to specimens and chemical fumes that can be very hazardous. There may be a rapid job growth projected for cytologists but only “thirty-one accredited cytotechnologist programs are available in the United States” (Tolia). Cytologists can work in many different health care facilities. They have the option of working in “hospitals, diagnostic laboratories, physicians’ offices, outpatient care centers and home health care” (Tolia). To become a cytologist, one will need to complete a bachelor’s degree program and finish a one to two year program accredited by the Commission of Allied Health Education Programs in Cytotechnology. Most Employers prefer that the cytologist pass the ASCP’s national Technologist in Cytoechnology certification exam. A cytologist must complete this program every three years to remain certified (Tolia). “Cytologists are either paid by the hour or through an annual salary. According to Salary.com, the median annual income for a cytologist is $62,401, with the least well compensated quarter of practitioners making less than $56,810 and the highest paid quarter making over $$67,386. According to Payscale, cytologists command an average salary of between $24.47 and $31.20 per hour, with standard time-and-a-half rates for overtime” (Wolfe). Cytologist’s play a large role in medical decisions and work closely with pathologists. “Cytologists can also gain industry recognition by submitting their written articles for publication and applying for front-cover exposure in the ASCT's publication” (Tolia). Cytologists must know how to read the doctor’s orders by using their knowledge of Medical terminology. Cytologists must use and communicate with their knowledge of Medical Terminology because all the work they do ultimately goes back to the doctor and goes along in response to the original order. When a cytologist is reporting they will also report to the histologist who “plays an important role in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease” (Torres). The next step in putting more pieces of the puzzle together is the histologist. The histologist “examines and analyzes cells and body fluids. They search for parasites, bacteria and other microorganisms” (Torres). I like that histologists “work in medical laboratories with pathologists and other laboratory experts” (Torres)....
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