Comparison B/W the Wanderer and the Seafarer

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Throughout the history of British Literature, there have always been the themes of loneliness, torment or exile. Many times authors speak from their experiences and at times those experiences have to do with misery and discomfort with their lifestyles. In the Renaissance age, times were not always happy and people chose to pass on stories generation to generation to reveal their feelings and experiences. Poems made a great impact in easing the pain. In the poems, "The Seafarer" and "The Wanderer", the themes of loneliness and exile exist throughout both of the poems. The unknown authors portray the two themes through detail and emotion.

"The Seafarer" creates a storyline of a man who is "lost" at sea. There is a major reference to the concept of the sea and how it "captures" the soul and leaves a lonely feeling. The character is set to know the consequence of the sea but something keeps calling him back to it. "And yet my heart wanders away, My soul roams with sea, the whales' home, wandering to the widest corners of the world, returning ravenous with desire, Flying solitary, screaming, exciting me to the ocean, breaking oaths on the curve of a wave." (lines 58-64). This poem also grasps the concept of religion and how it plays a role in this work. The character sets himself on religion and makes that as his "sanctuary" from the sea. "Thus the joys of God are fervent with life, where life itself fades quickly into the earth." (lines 64-66). The feeling of exile is presented throughout the writing. Symbolically, the sea is what keeps him apart from the world and that creates exile. There are a lot of symbols and images being used to prove the writer's point: "In icy bands, bound with frost, with frozen chains, and hardship groaned around my heart." (9-11). The images represent how he feels and how he sees his life at that moment. Symbolic gestures such as, "The song of the swan might serve for pleasure, the cry of the sea-fowl, the death-noise of...
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