Comparison Between Nutrition Patterns of Resident and Non-Resident College Students and Their Association with Academic Performance

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Al – Quds University Al – Quds University Al – Quds University

Al – Quds University
Faculty of Medicine
Applied Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Comparison between Nutrition Patterns of Resident and Non-Resident College Students and Their Association with Academic Performance

Alaa’ S. N. Darwazeh, Aseel M. M. Bzour, Thana’ J. I. Abu Farah, Marwa W. M. Tarayra and Mays Y. F. Ismail Applied epidemiology and biostatistics, Medicine Faculty, Al-Quds University

Abstract
The college years offer an opportunity for new experiences and different life style. They, in turn, play a main role in teaching students how to take on responsibilities; however, these may not necessarily contribute to improvement of both health status and academic performance of college students. Residency in Abu-Dies, in turn, may affect the latter variables significantly. In this study, we examined the relationship between residency and nutrition through examining some health behaviors (e.g. smoking, quality and quantity of healthy food, sleeping hours, caffeine consumption…) and its association with the academic performance among students ( n=160 resident and n=140 non-resident ). Results show that although resident students expressed better health status, non-resident students have better nutrition patterns as eating house-cooked and balanced food on time. For the academic performance, there was no association either with residency or nutrition. Implications of this issue among resident and non-resident students are discussed. Keywords

Residency; academic performance; nutrition patterns
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Al- Quds University 2011
Faculty of medicine Page2 Al – Quds University Al – Quds University Al – Quds University

The transition from high school to college often results in drastic changes to environment and resources, and such changes likely impact health-related behaviors (Wengreen & Moncur, 2009). These health-related behaviors, in turn, are associated with short- and long-term health consequences including injury, violence and greater risk of heart disease (Scott-Sheldon et al., 2008.

Truly, a massive amount of researches have been carried out to explore the variables that impinge academic success on college campus in the general student population (Banitt, 2002; Department of Physiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 2008; Scott-Sheldon et al., 2008). Yet not enough studies have considered the effect of residency on both students’ nutrition and academic performance, while such studies; in fact, can obviously increase attention among college administrators (Afful-Broni et al, 2010).

As mentioned earlier, grade point average (GPA) is one indicator of success and may be influenced greatly by health behaviors (Banitt, 2002) including nutrition patterns. Evidence illustrates that better nutrition is positively associated with gains in education in many areas; i.e. more grades completed and better performance on test scores. Students with short-run nutritional deficiencies are probably less able to pay attention and concentrate; and might have less energy for lessons, learning and homework (Berhman, 1996).

The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine academic performance (group of medical first-year students, 2010-2011) as a function of nutrition patterns among resident and non-resident college students in Al-Quds University. Consistent with prior research (Afful-Broni et al, 2010); we didn’t expect resident students to perform better than non-residential students. If a relationship exists between good health

Al- Quds University 2011

Al – Quds University Al – Quds University...
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