Comparison Between “Mother” and “Before You Were Mine” Simon Armitage and Carol Ann Duffy

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The two poems ‘Mother’ and ‘Before You Were Mine express ideas of a mother child relationship in two different ways. They both state the importance of the connection in this relationship and signify its positive qualities at the same time as making a vital contrast in the ideas they express about someone close to them. However, both poems have a slightly different take on this. ‘Mother’ positively explains the relationship and looks to how it will grow and develop in the future even though the mother and son have let go of each other and now live in separate house. ‘Before You Were Mine’ looks back on the life that her mother used to lead before she became a mum and tries to make similar connections with her own life and how she led it at the same point. It looks to the past and how the relationship has developed over the years, and tells us how the relationship has grown through the years. The feelings in the two poems are similar and different from each other. ‘Before You Were Mine’ feels more possessive. Carol Ann Duffy talks as if she is her mother’s owner and desperately tries to cling onto her. She looks back onto her mother’s life and relates it to her own whereas Simon Armitage writes about the future. ‘Mother’ is similar in that it does reflect on the memories he shared with his mother, but uses them as a stepping-stone to develop the relationship further, although his mother is his “anchor” and is holding him down from moving away. Carol Ann Duffy and Simon Armitage use many structures and poetic methods to reveal their ideas and feelings. Both poems appeal to many senses. You are able to visualise the words clearly and the words that are used, evoke many interesting senses within your mind. The poem by Simon Armitage uses rhyming in certain verses as a technique that makes the poem flow. ‘Mother, any distance greater than a single span

requires a second pair of hand.’
These two lines introduce the poem with a very unique effect,...
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