Compare the Ways in Which Heaney and Hughes Describe Their Storms.

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September 9th
Storm poems ( Re-draft ).

Compare the ways in which Heaney and Hughes describe their storms.

“Storm on the Island” starts in a very dramatic way by setting the scene of the poem on a lonely, deserted island.
Firstly, Seamus Heaney describes the surroundings in a way, to make the readers assume that the storm is set on a very bare waste land with a handful of residents on it that preparing for a storm that turns out to be more severe than they expected.

Seamus Heaney then goes on to putting the readers of the poem into the heart of the action by using carefully selected words such as “Blast,” helping us experience the true force of the storm. Heaney also uses a selection of words such as “Pummels” and “Bombarded” to make it seem as if the storm is terrorising the poor, defenceless island suggesting that it is like a bully.

Heaney also uses an oxymoron, when describing the storm by saying that the sea “exploded comfortably down on the cliffs,” as if to say that the sea had exploded down on the cliffs many times in previous storms that the cliffs had experienced its force before and were used to it . The writer might also be making it seem as if the sea is comfortable with doing such a huge amount of damage to the island.

I think that personification is one of the most important techniques used in the poem because Heaney refers to the storm as a number of things that it isn't to enhance the anger of the storm. Heaney uses personification to describe the storm by saying that it “Spat like a tamed cat turned savage,” in order to make it seem to the reader, that nature is a tame cat that is underestimated and when irritated can unexpectedly turn savage, spit and hiss.

Ted Hughes also uses personification in his poem ’Wind’ in order to make the reader feel as if his storm is also a bully and to encourage the reader to feel sorry for the storm’s victims. Ted Hughes writes “Flexing like the lens of a mad eye,” to push forth the image of...
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